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“The Cango Lyec Project - Healing the Elephant”: HIV related vulnerabilities of post-conflict affected populations aged 13–49 years living in three Mid-Northern Uganda districts

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Infectious Diseases, November 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (68th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (69th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
8 tweeters

Citations

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15 Dimensions

Readers on

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220 Mendeley
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Title
“The Cango Lyec Project - Healing the Elephant”: HIV related vulnerabilities of post-conflict affected populations aged 13–49 years living in three Mid-Northern Uganda districts
Published in
BMC Infectious Diseases, November 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12879-016-2030-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Samuel S. Malamba, Herbert Muyinda, Patricia M. Spittal, John P. Ekwaru, Noah Kiwanuka, Martin D. Ogwang, Patrick Odong, Paul K. Kitandwe, Achilles Katamba, Kate Jongbloed, Nelson K. Sewankambo, Eugene Kinyanda, Alden Blair, Martin T. Schechter

Abstract

The protracted war between the Government of Uganda and the Lord's Resistance Army in Northern Uganda (1996-2006) resulted in widespread atrocities, destruction of health infrastructure and services, weakening the social and economic fabric of the affected populations, internal displacement and death. Despite grave concerns that increased spread of HIV/AIDS may be devastating to post conflict Northern Uganda, empirical epidemiological data describing the legacy of the war on HIV infection are scarce. The 'Cango Lyec' Project is an open cohort study involving conflict-affected populations living in three districts of Gulu, Nwoya and Amuru in mid-northern Uganda. Between November 2011 and July 2012, 8 study communities randomly selected out of 32, were mapped and house-to-house census conducted to enumerate the entire community population. Consenting participants aged 13-49 years were enrolled and interviewer-administered data were collected on trauma, depression and socio-demographic-behavioural characteristics, in the local Luo language. Venous blood was taken for HIV and syphilis serology. Multivariable logistic regression was used to determine factors associated with HIV prevalence at baseline. A total of 2954 participants were eligible, of whom 2449 were enrolled. Among 2388 participants with known HIV status, HIV prevalence was 12.2% (95%CI: 10.8-13.8), higher in females (14.6%) than males (8.5%, p < 0.001), higher in Gulu (15.2%) than Nwoya (11.6%, p < 0.001) and Amuru (7.5%, p = 0.006) districts. In this post-conflict period, HIV infection was significantly associated with war trauma experiences (Adj. OR = 2.50; 95%CI: 1.31-4.79), the psychiatric problems of PTSD (Adj. OR = 1.44; 95%CI: 1.06-1.96), Major Depressive Disorder (Adj. OR = 1.89; 95%CI: 1.28-2.80) and suicidal ideation (Adj. OR = 1.87; 95%CI: 1.34-2.61). Other HIV related vulnerabilities included older age, being married, separated, divorced or widowed, residing in an urban district, ulcerative sexually transmitted infections, and staying in a female headed household. There was no evidence in this study to suggest that people with a history of abduction were more likely to be HIV positive. HIV prevalence in this post conflict-affected population is high and is significantly associated with age, trauma, depression, history of ulcerative STIs, and residing in more urban districts. Evidence-based HIV/STI prevention programs and culturally safe, gender and trauma-informed are urgently needed.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 8 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 220 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 220 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 36 16%
Student > Ph. D. Student 30 14%
Unspecified 26 12%
Researcher 23 10%
Student > Bachelor 15 7%
Other 38 17%
Unknown 52 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 30 14%
Social Sciences 28 13%
Unspecified 27 12%
Medicine and Dentistry 25 11%
Nursing and Health Professions 21 10%
Other 21 10%
Unknown 68 31%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 12 April 2017.
All research outputs
#2,466,064
of 9,679,413 outputs
Outputs from BMC Infectious Diseases
#1,007
of 4,116 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#99,776
of 314,782 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Infectious Diseases
#61
of 200 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 9,679,413 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 74th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,116 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.1. This one has done well, scoring higher than 75% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 314,782 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 68% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 200 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 69% of its contemporaries.