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Immunomodulation after ischemic stroke: potential mechanisms and implications for therapy

Overview of attention for article published in Critical Care, December 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (74th percentile)

Mentioned by

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11 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

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54 Dimensions

Readers on

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117 Mendeley
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Title
Immunomodulation after ischemic stroke: potential mechanisms and implications for therapy
Published in
Critical Care, December 2016
DOI 10.1186/s13054-016-1573-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Cynthia Santos Samary, Paolo Pelosi, Pedro Leme Silva, Patricia Rieken Macedo Rocco

Abstract

Brain injuries are often associated with intensive care admissions, and carry high morbidity and mortality rates. Ischemic stroke is one of the most frequent causes of injury to the central nervous system. It is now increasingly clear that human stroke causes multi-organ systemic disease. Brain inflammation may lead to opposing local and systemic effects. Suppression of systemic immunity by the nervous system could protect the brain from additional inflammatory damage; however, it may increase the susceptibility to infection. Pneumonia and urinary tract infection are the most common complications occurring in patients after stroke. The mechanisms involved in lung-brain interactions are still unknown, but some studies have suggested that inhibition of the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway and release of glucocorticoids, catecholamines, and damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) are among the pathophysiological mechanisms involved in communication from the ischemic brain to the lungs after stroke. This review describes the modifications in local and systemic immunity that occur after stroke, outlines mechanisms of stroke-induced immunosuppression and their role in pneumonia, and highlights potential therapeutic targets to reduce post-stroke complications. Despite significant advances towards a better understanding of the pathophysiology of ischemic stroke-induced immunosuppression and stroke-associated pneumonia (SAP) in recent years, many unanswered questions remain. The true incidence and outcomes of SAP, especially in intensive care unit settings, have yet to be determined, as has the full extent of stroke-induced immunosuppression and its clinical implications.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 11 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 117 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Spain 1 <1%
Canada 1 <1%
Unknown 115 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 20 17%
Student > Bachelor 14 12%
Student > Ph. D. Student 13 11%
Student > Postgraduate 12 10%
Student > Master 12 10%
Other 30 26%
Unknown 16 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 38 32%
Neuroscience 22 19%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 13 11%
Immunology and Microbiology 5 4%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 3%
Other 12 10%
Unknown 23 20%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 6. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 20 January 2018.
All research outputs
#3,684,255
of 15,681,050 outputs
Outputs from Critical Care
#2,355
of 4,961 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#96,964
of 388,819 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Critical Care
#176
of 219 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,681,050 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 76th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,961 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 15.5. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 52% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 388,819 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 74% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 219 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 19th percentile – i.e., 19% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.