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Low-carbohydrate, high-protein diet score and risk of incident cancer; a prospective cohort study

Overview of attention for article published in Nutrition Journal, May 2013
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (95th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
27 tweeters
facebook
4 Facebook pages
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page
googleplus
1 Google+ user

Citations

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19 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
78 Mendeley
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Title
Low-carbohydrate, high-protein diet score and risk of incident cancer; a prospective cohort study
Published in
Nutrition Journal, May 2013
DOI 10.1186/1475-2891-12-58
Pubmed ID
Authors

Lena Maria Nilsson, Anna Winkvist, Ingegerd Johansson, Bernt Lindahl, Göran Hallmans, Per Lenner, Bethany Van Guelpen

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Although carbohydrate reduction of varying degrees is a popular and controversial dietary trend, potential long-term effects for health, and cancer in specific, are largely unknown. METHODS: We studied a previously established low-carbohydrate, high-protein (LCHP) score in relation to the incidence of cancer and specific cancer types in a population-based cohort in northern Sweden. Participants were 62,582 men and women with up to 17.8 years of follow-up (median 9.7), including 3,059 prospective cancer cases. Cox regression analyses were performed for a LCHP score based on the sum of energy-adjusted deciles of carbohydrate (descending) and protein (ascending) intake labeled 1 to 10, with higher scores representing a diet lower in carbohydrates and higher in protein. Important potential confounders were accounted for, and the role of metabolic risk profile, macronutrient quality including saturated fat intake, and adequacy of energy intake reporting was explored. RESULTS: For the lowest to highest LCHP scores, 2 to 20, carbohydrate intakes ranged from median 60.9 to 38.9% of total energy intake. Both protein (primarily animal sources) and particularly fat (both saturated and unsaturated) intakes increased with increasing LCHP scores. LCHP score was not related to cancer risk, except for a non-dose-dependent, positive association for respiratory tract cancer that was statistically significant in men. The multivariate hazard ratio for medium (9--13) versus low (2--8) LCHP scores was 1.84 (95% confidence interval: 1.05-3.23; p-trend = 0.38). Other analyses were largely consistent with the main results, although LCHP score was associated with colorectal cancer risk inversely in women with high saturated fat intakes, and positively in men with higher LCHP scores based on vegetable protein. CONCLUSION: These largely null results provide important information concerning the long-term safety of moderate carbohydrate reduction and consequent increases in protein and, in this cohort, especially fat intakes. In order to determine the effects of stricter carbohydrate restriction, further studies encompassing a wider range of macronutrient intakes are warranted.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 27 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 78 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Australia 2 3%
United Kingdom 1 1%
Unknown 75 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 19 24%
Researcher 12 15%
Student > Master 10 13%
Student > Postgraduate 7 9%
Professor 6 8%
Other 18 23%
Unknown 6 8%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 30 38%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 16 21%
Nursing and Health Professions 13 17%
Sports and Recreations 2 3%
Immunology and Microbiology 1 1%
Other 7 9%
Unknown 9 12%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 29. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 16 September 2019.
All research outputs
#936,926
of 19,088,857 outputs
Outputs from Nutrition Journal
#278
of 1,343 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#8,325
of 167,352 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Nutrition Journal
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 19,088,857 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 95th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,343 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 31.1. This one has done well, scoring higher than 79% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 167,352 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them