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SurvivalGWAS_Power: a user friendly tool for power calculations in pharmacogenetic studies with “time to event” outcomes

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Bioinformatics, December 2016
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Mentioned by

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4 tweeters

Citations

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4 Dimensions

Readers on

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22 Mendeley
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Title
SurvivalGWAS_Power: a user friendly tool for power calculations in pharmacogenetic studies with “time to event” outcomes
Published in
BMC Bioinformatics, December 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12859-016-1407-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

Hamzah Syed, Andrea L. Jorgensen, Andrew P. Morris

Abstract

Power calculators are currently available for the design of genetic association studies of binary phenotypes and quantitative traits, but not for "time to event" outcomes, which are of particular relevance in pharmacogenetics. With the rapid emergence of pharmacogenetic association studies of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), and the complexity of clinical outcomes they consider, there is a need for software to perform power calculations of time to event data over a range of design scenarios and analytical methodologies. We have developed the user friendly software tool SurvivalGWAS_Power to perform power calculations for time to event outcomes over a range of study designs and different analytical approaches. The software calculates the power to detect SNP association with a time to event outcome over a range of study design scenarios. The software enables analyses under a Cox proportional hazards model or Weibull regression model, and can account for treatment and SNP-treatment interaction effects. Simulated data sets can also be generated by SurvivalGWAS_Power to enable analyses with methods that are not currently supported by the power calculator, thereby increasing the flexibility of the software. SurvivalGWAS_Power addresses the need for flexible and user-friendly software for power calculations for genetic association studies of time to event outcomes, with particular design features of relevance in pharmacogenetics.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 22 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 22 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 8 36%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 14%
Student > Bachelor 2 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 1 5%
Student > Master 1 5%
Other 2 9%
Unknown 5 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 5 23%
Medicine and Dentistry 3 14%
Engineering 2 9%
Computer Science 2 9%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 9%
Other 3 14%
Unknown 5 23%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 11 December 2016.
All research outputs
#6,737,683
of 11,293,566 outputs
Outputs from BMC Bioinformatics
#2,749
of 4,195 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#160,667
of 319,060 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Bioinformatics
#72
of 133 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,293,566 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 38th percentile – i.e., 38% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,195 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.9. This one is in the 30th percentile – i.e., 30% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 319,060 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 46th percentile – i.e., 46% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 133 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 43rd percentile – i.e., 43% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.