↓ Skip to main content

Prevalence and risk factors for vitamin D insufficiency and deficiency at birth and associated outcome

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Pediatrics, December 2016
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (53rd percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

twitter
3 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
15 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
49 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Prevalence and risk factors for vitamin D insufficiency and deficiency at birth and associated outcome
Published in
BMC Pediatrics, December 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12887-016-0741-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Ian Marshall, Rajeev Mehta, Charletta Ayers, Smita Dhumal, Anna Petrova

Abstract

Occurrence and consequence of cord blood (CB) vitamin D insufficiency/deficiency has not been adequately explored despite rising concern regarding this topic in pediatrics. This study was designed to determine the rate, maternal risk factors, and clinical outcomes in infants in association with vitamin D insufficient/deficient status at birth. American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) defined levels (ng/mL) were utilized to categorize the vitamin D status in CB samples as deficient (5-15), insufficient (16-20), and sufficient (21-100). We used descriptive statistics and multiple regression models to identify the rate and factors associated with vitamin D deficiency/insufficiency and related outcomes in the enrolled mother-infant pairs. This prospective study was conducted at a single center on postpartum women and their infants. Vitamin D deficiency and insufficiency was recorded in 38.9 and 29.8% respectively of the 265 CB samples. Deficient CB vitamin D levels in infants were associated with maternal Black, Hispanic, or Asian race/ethnicity, younger age, and increased number of pregnancies. The likelihood for infants to be born with an insufficient vitamin D level increases with younger maternal age and the number of pregnancies as well as Asian ethnicity. We did not find an association between the vitamin D status at birth and pre-discharge clinical characteristics of the neonates. The likelihood for an infant to be born with vitamin D deficiency/insufficiency is relatively high and is related mainly to younger maternal age, gravidity, and non-White race/ethnicity. Our findings raise a question regarding the adequacy of the AAP recommended vitamin D supplementation requirements without knowing the infant's vitamin D status at birth.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 49 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 49 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 10 20%
Student > Bachelor 6 12%
Lecturer 5 10%
Student > Postgraduate 4 8%
Other 4 8%
Other 13 27%
Unknown 7 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 26 53%
Nursing and Health Professions 5 10%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 8%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 6%
Social Sciences 2 4%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 9 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 17 December 2016.
All research outputs
#4,366,171
of 9,105,764 outputs
Outputs from BMC Pediatrics
#621
of 1,173 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#143,788
of 311,610 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Pediatrics
#24
of 48 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 9,105,764 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 51st percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,173 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.4. This one is in the 46th percentile – i.e., 46% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 311,610 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 53% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 48 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 50% of its contemporaries.