↓ Skip to main content

A neglected opportunity for China’s tobacco control? Shift in smoking behavior during and after wives’ pregnancy

Overview of attention for article published in Tobacco Induced Diseases, December 2016
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age

Mentioned by

twitter
1 tweeter

Citations

dimensions_citation
4 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
22 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
A neglected opportunity for China’s tobacco control? Shift in smoking behavior during and after wives’ pregnancy
Published in
Tobacco Induced Diseases, December 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12971-016-0105-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Hao Yin, Hao Yin, Xiao Chen, Pinpin Zheng, Michelle Kegler, Qinfeng Shen, Biao Xu

Abstract

Although observational data suggest that men's attempts and behavior at quitting smoking are often stimulated during their spouses' pregnancy, few studies have systematically examined this phenomenon. This was a cross-sectional study which examined Chinese men's smoking behaviors during and after their wives' pregnancy. Women who visited community health centers for routine immunization of their children were approached. Information was mainly collected on men's tobacco use before, during and after pregnancy in July to August 2011. Individual and socio-environmental factors were examined by non-conditional logistical regression analysis to find potential reasons behind men's quitting during pregnancy and maintained this change till the post-partum period. Totally 765 of 811 eligible women (94.3%) completed the interview. Prior to pregnancy, 42.9% of husbands smoked; this decreased to 36.34% during pregnancy, a reduction of 6.53%. Although the rate increased to a higher level (43.79%) after delivery, positive changes in men's smoking behavior were detected. One-third (29.88%) reduced the daily number of cigarettes smoked, and nearly half (45.12%) relocated themselves to smoke when their pregnant wives were nearby. Noticeably, those who quit were most likely occasional smokers (Odds Ratio(OR) = 4.83, 95%CI [2.22, 10.48]), smoking less than ten years (OR = 2.80, 95%CI [1.19, 6.58]), not smoking at home (OR = 4.48, 95%CI [1.94, 10.39]), not smoking for social use (OR = 4.05, 95%CI [1.74, 9.41]), under lower financial pressure after the birth of child (OR = 5.28, 95%CI [2.14, 13.02]) and influenced by family members (OR = 2.82, 95%CI [1.25, 6.38]). However, only 22% of spontaneous cessation was maintained postpartum. Most relapses occurred within 6 months after delivery. Pregnancy offers an opportunity to decrease smoking amongst Chinese males. Intervention programs involving expectant fathers may be effective to further reduce prevalence of smoking among men in China.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 22 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 22 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 4 18%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 18%
Student > Postgraduate 2 9%
Researcher 2 9%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 9%
Other 3 14%
Unknown 5 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 4 18%
Social Sciences 3 14%
Medicine and Dentistry 3 14%
Psychology 2 9%
Business, Management and Accounting 1 5%
Other 4 18%
Unknown 5 23%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 09 December 2016.
All research outputs
#4,725,061
of 8,748,067 outputs
Outputs from Tobacco Induced Diseases
#109
of 168 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#164,119
of 299,698 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Tobacco Induced Diseases
#5
of 7 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,748,067 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 27th percentile – i.e., 27% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 168 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.8. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 299,698 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 35th percentile – i.e., 35% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 7 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 2 of them.