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Perinatal mortality among infants born during health user-fees (Cash

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, December 2016
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Title
Perinatal mortality among infants born during health user-fees (Cash & Carry) and the national health insurance scheme (NHIS) eras in Ghana: a cross-sectional study
Published in
BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, December 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12884-016-1179-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Abdallah Ibrahim, Ernest T. Maya, Ernestina Donkor, Irene A. Agyepong, Richard M. Adanu

Abstract

This research determined the rates of perinatal mortality among infants delivered under Ghana's national health insurance scheme (NHIS) compared to infants delivered under the previous "Cash and Carry" system in Northern Region, especially as the country takes stock of its progress toward meeting the Millennium Development Goals (MDG) 4 and 5. The labor and maternity wards delivery records of infants delivered before and after the implementation of the NHIS in Northern Region were examined. Records of available daily deliveries during the two health systems were extracted. Fisher's exact tests of non-random association were used to examine the bivariate association between categorical independent variables and perinatal mortality. On average, 8% of infants delivered during the health user-fee (Cash & Carry) died compared to about 4% infant deaths during the NHIS delivery fee exemption period in Northern Region, Ghana. There were no remarkable difference in the rate of infant deaths among mothers in almost all age categories in both the Cash and Carry and the NHIS periods except in mothers age 35 years and older. Infants born to multiparous mothers were significantly more likely to die than those born to first time mothers. There were more twin deaths during the Cash and Carry system (p = 0.001) compared to the NHIS system. Deliveries by caesarean section increased from an average of 14% in the "Cash and Carry" era to an average of 20% in the NHIS era. The overall rate of perinatal mortality declined by half (50%) in infants born during the NHIS era compared to the Cash and Carry era. However, caesarean deliveries increased during the NHIS era. These findings suggest that pregnant women in the Northern Region of Ghana were able to access the opportunity to utilize the NHIS for antenatal visits and possibly utilized skilled care at delivery at no cost or very minimal cost to them, which therefore improved Ghana's progress towards meeting the MDG 4, (reducing under-five deaths by two-thirds).

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 116 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 116 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 32 28%
Researcher 18 16%
Student > Bachelor 11 9%
Student > Postgraduate 10 9%
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 6%
Other 16 14%
Unknown 22 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 31 27%
Nursing and Health Professions 23 20%
Social Sciences 16 14%
Business, Management and Accounting 5 4%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 3%
Other 14 12%
Unknown 23 20%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 09 December 2016.
All research outputs
#7,585,388
of 8,748,067 outputs
Outputs from BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth
#1,672
of 1,779 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#243,270
of 299,698 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth
#68
of 76 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,748,067 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,779 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.0. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 76 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.