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Bile acid: a potential inducer of colon cancer stem cells

Overview of attention for article published in Stem Cell Research & Therapy, December 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (62nd percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (61st percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
2 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page
googleplus
1 Google+ user

Citations

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70 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
90 Mendeley
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Title
Bile acid: a potential inducer of colon cancer stem cells
Published in
Stem Cell Research & Therapy, December 2016
DOI 10.1186/s13287-016-0439-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Lulu Farhana, Pratima Nangia-Makker, Evan Arbit, Kathren Shango, Sarah Sarkar, Hamidah Mahmud, Timothy Hadden, Yingjie Yu, Adhip P. N. Majumdar

Abstract

Although the unconjugated secondary bile acids, specifically deoxycholic acid (DCA) and lithocholic acid (LCA), are considered to be risk factors for colorectal cancer, the precise mechanism(s) by which they regulate carcinogenesis is poorly understood. We hypothesize that the cytotoxic bile acids may promote stemness in colonic epithelial cells leading to generation of cancer stem cells (CSCs) that play a role in the development and progression of colon cancer. Normal human colonic epithelial cells (HCoEpiC) were used to study bile acid DCA/LCA-mediated induction of CSCs. The expression of CSC markers was measured by real-time qPCR. Flow cytometry was used to isolate CSCs. T-cell factor/lymphoid-enhancing factor (TCF/LEF) luciferase assay was employed to examine the transcriptional activity of β-catenin. Downregulation of muscarinic 3 receptor (M3R) was achieved through transfection of corresponding siRNA. We found DCA/LCA to induce CSCs in normal human colonic epithelial cells, as evidenced by the increased proportion of CSCs, elevated levels of several CSC markers, as well as a number of epithelial-mesenchymal transition markers together with increased colonosphere formation, drug exclusion, ABCB1 and ABCG2 expression, and induction of M3R, p-EGFR, matrix metallopeptidases, and c-Myc. Inhibition of M3R signaling greatly suppressed DCA/LCA induction of the CSC marker ALDHA1 and also c-Myc mRNA expression as well as transcriptional activation of TCF/LEF. Our results suggest that bile acids, specifically DCA and LCA, induce cancer stemness in colonic epithelial cells by modulating M3R and Wnt/β-catenin signaling and thus could be considered promoters of colon cancer.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 90 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Poland 1 1%
Unknown 89 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 14 16%
Student > Ph. D. Student 13 14%
Student > Bachelor 13 14%
Student > Master 11 12%
Student > Doctoral Student 8 9%
Other 10 11%
Unknown 21 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 18 20%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 17 19%
Medicine and Dentistry 12 13%
Immunology and Microbiology 8 9%
Engineering 3 3%
Other 8 9%
Unknown 24 27%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 29 March 2019.
All research outputs
#7,390,319
of 14,565,734 outputs
Outputs from Stem Cell Research & Therapy
#450
of 1,342 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#142,049
of 379,929 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Stem Cell Research & Therapy
#30
of 77 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,565,734 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 48th percentile – i.e., 48% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,342 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.2. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 65% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 379,929 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 62% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 77 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 61% of its contemporaries.