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Exosomes play an important role in the process of psoralen reverse multidrug resistance of breast cancer

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Experimental & Clinical Cancer Research, December 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (52nd percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (86th percentile)

Mentioned by

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3 tweeters

Citations

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55 Dimensions

Readers on

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46 Mendeley
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Title
Exosomes play an important role in the process of psoralen reverse multidrug resistance of breast cancer
Published in
Journal of Experimental & Clinical Cancer Research, December 2016
DOI 10.1186/s13046-016-0468-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Xiaohong Wang, Chengfeng Xu, Yitong Hua, Leitao Sun, Kai Cheng, Zhongming Jia, Yong Han, Jianli Dong, Yuzhen Cui, Zhenlin Yang

Abstract

Release of exosomes have been shown to play critical roles in drug resistance by delivering cargo. Targeting the transfer of exosomes from resistant cells to sensitive cells may be an approach to overcome some cases of drug resistance. In this study, we investigated the potential role of exosomes in the process of psoralen reverse multidrug resistance of MCF-7/ADR cells. Exosomes were isolated by differential centrifugation of culture media from MCF-7/ADR cells (ADR/exo) and MCF-7 parental cells (S/exo). Exosomes were characterized by morphology, exosomal markers and size distribution. The ability of ADR/exo to transfer multidrug resistance was assessed by MTT and real-time quantitative PCR. The different formation and secretion of exosomes were detected by immunofluorescence and transmission electron microscopy. Then we performed comparative transcriptomic analysis using RNA-Seq technology and real-time quantitative PCR to better understand the gene expression regulation in exosmes formation and release after psoralen treatment. Our data showed that exosomes derived from MCF-7/ADR cells were able to promote active sequestration of drugs and could induce a drug resistance phenotype by transferring drug-resistance-related gene MDR-1 and P-glycoprotein protein. Psoralen could reduce the formation and secretion of exosomes to overcome drug resistance. There were 21 differentially expressed genes. Gene ontology (GO) pathway analysis and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathway analysis showed that the most significantly expressed genes were linked to PPAR and P53 signaling pathways which were related to exosomes formation, secretion and cargo sorting. Psoralen can affect the exosomes and induce the reduction of resistance transmission via exosomes might through PPAR and P53 signaling pathways, which might provide a novel strategy for breast cancer resistance to chemotherapy in the future.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 46 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Denmark 1 2%
Unknown 45 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 15 33%
Researcher 6 13%
Student > Master 5 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 9%
Student > Bachelor 4 9%
Other 3 7%
Unknown 9 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 12 26%
Medicine and Dentistry 5 11%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 5 11%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 3 7%
Engineering 3 7%
Other 6 13%
Unknown 12 26%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 20 December 2017.
All research outputs
#7,892,671
of 13,785,324 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Experimental & Clinical Cancer Research
#280
of 988 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#175,830
of 377,131 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Experimental & Clinical Cancer Research
#14
of 108 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,785,324 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 42nd percentile – i.e., 42% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 988 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.7. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 71% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 377,131 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 52% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 108 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 86% of its contemporaries.