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Oxidative stress in cancer-bearing dogs assessed by measuring serum malondialdehyde

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Veterinary Research, May 2013
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  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (70th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (90th percentile)

Mentioned by

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3 tweeters
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8 Facebook pages

Citations

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26 Dimensions

Readers on

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60 Mendeley
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Title
Oxidative stress in cancer-bearing dogs assessed by measuring serum malondialdehyde
Published in
BMC Veterinary Research, May 2013
DOI 10.1186/1746-6148-9-101
Pubmed ID
Authors

Arayaporn Macotpet, Fanan Suksawat, Peerapol Sukon, Komgrit Pimpakdee, Ekkachai Pattarapanwichien, Roongpet Tangrassameeprasert, Patcharee Boonsiri

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Oxidative stress, an excess of reactive oxygen species (ROS), causes lipid peroxidation resulting in cell and tissue damages. It may be associated with the development and progression of cancers in dogs. Malondialdehyde (MDA), the end product of lipid peroxidation, is commonly used as a marker of oxidative stress. The objective of this study was to assess oxidative stress in cancer-bearing dogs by measuring serum MDA levels. All client-owned dogs underwent physical examination at the Veterinary Teaching Hospital, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Khon Kaen University to determine the health status with the owner's consent. Blood samples of cancer-bearing dogs (N = 80) and clinically normal dogs (N = 101) were obtained and subjected for determination of MDA levels. In addition, complete blood count, creatinine, and alanine aminotransferase were measured. RESULTS: Serum MDA was significantly higher in cancer-bearing dogs than in clinically normal dogs (mean +/- SD, 4.68 +/- 1.32 mumol/L vs 2.95 +/- 0.61 mumol/L, respectively; p < 0.001). Packed cell volume (mean +/- SD, 36.18 +/- 7.65% vs 44.84 +/- 5.54%), hemoglobin (mean +/- SD, 11.93 +/- 2.88 g% vs 15.17 +/- 2.00 g%) and red blood cells (median (IQA), 6.05 (2.15) vs 8.09 (1.34)) were all significantly lower in cancer-bearing dogs than in clinically normal dogs. However, the reverse was true for white blood cells (median (IQA), 18.20 (11.95) vs 14.90 (5.10)). Neither creatinine nor alanine aminotransferase levels were significantly different between groups. CONCLUSIONS: This study supports the conclusion that oxidative stress is associated with many types of cancers in dogs, as serum MDA levels were significantly higher in cancer-bearing dogs compared to clinically normal dogs.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 60 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Iran, Islamic Republic of 1 2%
United States 1 2%
Brazil 1 2%
Unknown 57 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 10 17%
Student > Bachelor 8 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 6 10%
Student > Postgraduate 6 10%
Other 4 7%
Other 16 27%
Unknown 10 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 26 43%
Medicine and Dentistry 14 23%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 6 10%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 3%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 2%
Other 1 2%
Unknown 10 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 24 May 2019.
All research outputs
#4,392,318
of 15,096,298 outputs
Outputs from BMC Veterinary Research
#343
of 2,212 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#44,096
of 155,462 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Veterinary Research
#3
of 41 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,096,298 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 70th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,212 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.1. This one has done well, scoring higher than 83% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 155,462 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 70% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 41 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its contemporaries.