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Implications of methodological differences in measuring the rates of exclusive breastfeeding in Nepal: findings from literature review and cohort study

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, December 2016
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Title
Implications of methodological differences in measuring the rates of exclusive breastfeeding in Nepal: findings from literature review and cohort study
Published in
BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, December 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12884-016-1180-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

Vishnu Khanal, Andy H. Lee, Jane A. Scott, Rajendra Karkee, Colin W. Binns

Abstract

Correct measurement and continuous monitoring of exclusive breastfeeding are essential to promote exclusive breastfeeding. Measuring exclusive breastfeeding is a complex issue as rates can vary according to the definition, measurement period, questions asked, and infant's age. This article reviewed the methodology of reporting exclusive breastfeeding in Nepal, and compared exclusive breastfeeding rates using data from a cohort study undertaken in western Nepal. A literature review was first conducted on studies published during 2000-2014. In our cohort study, 735 mother-infant pairs were recruited within the first month postpartum and followed up during the fourth and sixth months. The majority of studies in Nepal, including national surveys, used the World Health Organization (WHO) recommended definition (only breastmilk with the exception of medicine and vitamin syrup), and the most common measurement period was a 24-h recall. Our data demonstrated that the exclusive breastfeeding rate during the sixth month was 8.9% using the recall-since-birth method but was 18.7% using the 24-h recall method. Substantial differences in rates were also found during the first (66.3% vs 83.9%) and fourth months (39.2% vs 61.1%). We found that recent studies reporting exclusive breastfeeding in Nepal varied considerably in methodology. The most commonly used measurement, the 24-h recall, leads to over-estimation of the prevalence of exclusive breastfeeding when compared to the recall-since-birth method. A common standard of reporting exclusive breastfeeding is clearly needed for evidence-based decision making.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 64 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 64 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 9 14%
Researcher 6 9%
Lecturer 6 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 8%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 8%
Other 12 19%
Unknown 21 33%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 16 25%
Medicine and Dentistry 10 16%
Social Sciences 3 5%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 3%
Arts and Humanities 2 3%
Other 6 9%
Unknown 25 39%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 23 December 2016.
All research outputs
#8,484,952
of 9,725,367 outputs
Outputs from BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth
#1,799
of 1,912 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#255,462
of 314,879 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth
#70
of 78 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 9,725,367 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 78 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.