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Oxytocin is implicated in social memory deficits induced by early sensory deprivation in mice

Overview of attention for article published in Molecular Brain, December 2016
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Title
Oxytocin is implicated in social memory deficits induced by early sensory deprivation in mice
Published in
Molecular Brain, December 2016
DOI 10.1186/s13041-016-0278-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jin-Bao Zhang, Ling Chen, Zhu-Man Lv, Xue-Yuan Niu, Can-Can Shao, Chan Zhang, Michal Pruski, Ying Huang, Cong-Cong Qi, Ning-Ning Song, Bing Lang, Yu-Qiang Ding

Abstract

Early-life sensory input plays a crucial role in brain development. Although deprivation of orofacial sensory input at perinatal stages disrupts the establishment of the barrel cortex and relevant callosal connections, its long-term effect on adult behavior remains elusive. In this study, we investigated the behavioral phenotypes in adult mice with unilateral transection of the infraorbital nerve (ION) at postnatal day 3 (P3). Although ION-transected mice had normal locomotor activity, motor coordination, olfaction, anxiety-like behaviors, novel object memory, preference for social novelty and sociability, they presented deficits in social memory and spatial memory compared with control mice. In addition, the social memory deficit was associated with reduced oxytocin (OXT) levels in the hypothalamus and could be partially restored by intranasal administration of OXT. Thus, early sensory deprivation does result in behavioral alterations in mice, some of which may be associated with the disruption of oxytocin signaling.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 69 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 69 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 13 19%
Researcher 12 17%
Student > Master 7 10%
Student > Bachelor 7 10%
Other 6 9%
Other 13 19%
Unknown 11 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Neuroscience 19 28%
Psychology 15 22%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 6 9%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 5 7%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 3%
Other 9 13%
Unknown 13 19%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 15 December 2016.
All research outputs
#6,685,977
of 8,775,174 outputs
Outputs from Molecular Brain
#362
of 456 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#209,201
of 300,237 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Molecular Brain
#8
of 12 outputs
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So far Altmetric has tracked 456 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.1. This one is in the 2nd percentile – i.e., 2% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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