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Effects on and transfer across the blood-brain barrier in vitro—Comparison of organic and inorganic mercury species

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Pharmacology and Toxicology, December 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (53rd percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (52nd percentile)

Mentioned by

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6 tweeters

Citations

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33 Dimensions

Readers on

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40 Mendeley
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Title
Effects on and transfer across the blood-brain barrier in vitro—Comparison of organic and inorganic mercury species
Published in
BMC Pharmacology and Toxicology, December 2016
DOI 10.1186/s40360-016-0106-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Hanna Lohren, Julia Bornhorst, Romy Fitkau, Gabriele Pohl, Hans-Joachim Galla, Tanja Schwerdtle

Abstract

Transport of methylmercury (MeHg) across the blood-brain barrier towards the brain side is well discussed in literature, while ethylmercury (EtHg) and inorganic mercury are not adequately characterized regarding their entry into the brain. Studies investigating a possible efflux out of the brain are not described to our knowledge. This study compares, for the first time, effects of organic methylmercury chloride (MeHgCl), EtHg-containing thiomersal and inorganic Hg chloride (HgCl2) on as well as their transfer across a primary porcine in vitro model of the blood-brain barrier. With respect to the barrier integrity, the barrier model exhibited a much higher sensitivity towards HgCl2 following basolateral incubation (brain-facing side) as compared to apical application (blood-facing side). These HgCl2 induced effects on the barrier integrity after brain side incubation are comparable to that of the organic species, although MeHgCl and thiomersal exerted much higher cytotoxic effects in the barrier building cells. Hg transfer rates following exposure to organic species in both directions argue for diffusion as transfer mechanism. Inorganic Hg application surprisingly resulted in a Hg transfer out of the brain-facing compartment. In case of MeHgCl and thiomersal incubation, mercury crossed the barrier in both directions, with a slight accumulation in the basolateral, brain-facing compartment, after simultaneous incubation in both compartments. For HgCl2, our data provide first evidence that the blood-brain barrier transfers mercury out of the brain.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 6 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 40 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 40 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 9 23%
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 23%
Student > Master 8 20%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 8%
Researcher 3 8%
Other 1 3%
Unknown 7 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Chemistry 6 15%
Medicine and Dentistry 5 13%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 4 10%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 8%
Environmental Science 3 8%
Other 8 20%
Unknown 11 28%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 08 February 2019.
All research outputs
#11,851,309
of 20,945,747 outputs
Outputs from BMC Pharmacology and Toxicology
#157
of 399 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#190,571
of 419,375 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Pharmacology and Toxicology
#16
of 36 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 20,945,747 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 42nd percentile – i.e., 42% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 399 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.5. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 60% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 419,375 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 53% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 36 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 52% of its contemporaries.