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Amoebic liver abscess: an unusual cause for a right iliac fossa mass: a case report

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Infectious Diseases, December 2016
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Title
Amoebic liver abscess: an unusual cause for a right iliac fossa mass: a case report
Published in
BMC Infectious Diseases, December 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12879-016-2093-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Vithiya Ratnasamy, Kumanan Thirunavukarasu, Kannathasan Selvam, Murugananthan Arumugam

Abstract

Amoebic liver abscess is the most common extra intestinal manifestation of amoebiasis in tropical countries. It usually presents with right hypochondrial pain, fever and anorexia. Amoebic liver abscess has gained clinical significance due to the wide variety of clinical presentations which can cause diagnostic dilemmas and high mortality in untreated cases. We report a case of a 63-year-old male with a history of anorexia for 3 weeks, fever for 4 days and examination findings of tender hepatomegaly with a liver span of 15 cm in the mid clavicular line and a firm irregular mass in the right iliac fossa. Ultrasound scan of the abdomen showed two large liver abscesses with one of them leaking into the peritoneal cavity causing a localized pus collection, which had been walled off in the right iliac fossa. He was treated with metronidazole and liver abscesses were drained percutaneously under ultrasound scan guidance. The diagnosis of Entamoeba histolytica infection was confirmed with the serology and subsequently by PCR from the aspirated material. He made an uneventful recovery with resolution of the symptoms and right iliac fossa mass. Recognition of variable presentation of amoebic liver abscess is vital, considering the curable nature of this disease and potentially fatal outcome of untreated abscess. An intra-abdominal mass in a patient with amoebic liver abscess should raise the suspicion of a localized collection of pus and impending generalized peritonitis. Early diagnosis and prompt intervention can prevent the dreaded complication of peritonitis and toxemia, and hence reduce the consequent morbidity and mortality.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 18 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 18 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 4 22%
Student > Postgraduate 2 11%
Lecturer > Senior Lecturer 2 11%
Librarian 2 11%
Unspecified 1 6%
Other 3 17%
Unknown 4 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 8 44%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 11%
Environmental Science 1 6%
Social Sciences 1 6%
Unspecified 1 6%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 5 28%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 18 December 2016.
All research outputs
#7,621,872
of 8,787,207 outputs
Outputs from BMC Infectious Diseases
#3,475
of 3,878 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#244,204
of 299,663 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Infectious Diseases
#139
of 188 outputs
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