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Patients’ worries before starting antiretroviral therapy and their association with treatment adherence and outcomes: a prospective study in rural Uganda, 2004 - 2009

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Research Notes, May 2013
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2 tweeters

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3 Dimensions

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31 Mendeley
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Title
Patients’ worries before starting antiretroviral therapy and their association with treatment adherence and outcomes: a prospective study in rural Uganda, 2004 - 2009
Published in
BMC Research Notes, May 2013
DOI 10.1186/1756-0500-6-187
Pubmed ID
Authors

Billy N Mayanja, Kenneth Ekoru, Harriet Namugenyi, Rosemary Lubega, Joseph O Mugisha

Abstract

BACKGROUND: In HIV-infected persons, good adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) is essential for successful treatment outcomes. Patients' worries before starting ART may affect their ART adherence and treatment outcomes. METHODS: Between 2004 and 2009, HIV-infected individuals in a prospective cohort study in rural Uganda were assessed for ART eligibility. A counsellor explained the ART eligibility criteria, adherence and side effects, and recorded the patients' worries related to ART. Every quarter, patients who initiated ART had clinical, immunological (CD4 cell counts) and virological (viral loads) assessments, and data were collected on ART adherence using patients' self-reports and pill counts. We describe the patients' worries and examine their association with ART adherence, and immunological and virological outcomes. RESULTS: We assessed 421 patients, 271 (64%) were females, 318 (76%) were aged 30 years and above and 315 (75%) were eligible for ART. 277 (66%) reported any worry, and the proportions were similar by sex, age group and ART eligibility status. The baseline median CD4 counts and viral loads were similar among patients with any worry and those with no worry. The commonest worries were: fear of HIV serostatus disclosure; among 69 (16%) participants, lack of food when appetite improved after starting ART; 50 (12%), concurrent use of other medications; 33 (8%), adherence to ART; 28 (7%) and problems concerning condom use; 27 (6%). After 24 months or more on ART, patients who reported any worry had made more scheduled ART refill visits than patients who reported no worry (p<0.01), but the annual CD4 cell increases were similar (p=0.12). After one year on ART, patients who reported any worry had greater virological suppression than patients who reported no worry (p<0.05). CONCLUSIONS: Despite the lack of significant associations of worries with unfavourable ART outcomes, physicians and counsellors should assist patients in overcoming their worries that can cause stress and discomfort. Food supplements may be desirable for some patients initiating ART.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 31 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 31 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 8 26%
Researcher 5 16%
Student > Bachelor 5 16%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 16%
Lecturer 2 6%
Other 2 6%
Unknown 4 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 11 35%
Nursing and Health Professions 6 19%
Social Sciences 3 10%
Business, Management and Accounting 2 6%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 3%
Other 3 10%
Unknown 5 16%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 06 June 2013.
All research outputs
#9,553,618
of 12,434,754 outputs
Outputs from BMC Research Notes
#1,786
of 2,778 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#95,787
of 146,625 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Research Notes
#20
of 32 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,434,754 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 19th percentile – i.e., 19% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,778 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.4. This one is in the 30th percentile – i.e., 30% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 146,625 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 30th percentile – i.e., 30% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 32 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 28th percentile – i.e., 28% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.