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Multicenter prospective study on the burden of rotavirus gastroenteritis in children less than 3 years of age in Spain

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Infectious Diseases, October 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (59th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (61st percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
4 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

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6 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
55 Mendeley
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Title
Multicenter prospective study on the burden of rotavirus gastroenteritis in children less than 3 years of age in Spain
Published in
BMC Infectious Diseases, October 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12879-016-1890-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

J. Arístegui, J. Ferrer, I. Salamanca, E. Garrote, A. Partidas, M. San-Martin, B. San-Jose

Abstract

Rotavirus is acknowledged as an important cause of paediatric gastroenteritis worldwide. In Spain, comprehensive data on the burden of rotavirus disease was lacking. A prospective, multicenter, observational study was carried out, during the winter season, from October to April 2014 in selected areas of Spain (Catalonia, Basque Country, Andalusia) to estimate the frequency and characteristics of acute gastroenteritis (AGE) and rotavirus gastroenteritis (RVGE) in children ≤3 years of age seeking medical care in primary care and emergency department centres. Of the 1087 episodes of AGE registered, 33.89 % were RVGE positive. The estimated incidence of RVGE, was 40.3 (95 % CI 36.1-44.8) episodes per 10,000 child-months in children ≤ 3 years of age and the 5-month (December-April) seasonal RVGE incidence rate was 2.01 [1.81-2.24] per 100 children. No vaccination and attending a day care centre were the main risk factors for RV infection. RVGE infected children presented more frequently with fever (63.9 % vs. 45.1 %, p = 0.009), vomiting (61.2 % vs. 44.3 %, p = 0.015), suffered more dehydration, and were hospitalised and went to the emergency room more often (41.7 % vs. 15.7 %, p <0.001) than non-RVGE infected ones. Children were usually more tired (77.5 % vs. 54.2 %, p <0.001), tearful, (47.2 % vs. 34.8 %, p <0.001), and easily irritated (76.5 % vs. 59.8 %, p <0.001), and parents were more concerned (41.7 % vs. 15.7 %, p <0.001) and suffered more working rhythm disturbances (39.0 % vs. 22.9 %, p <0.001). The cost for families of RVGE cases was significantly higher than the cost of non-RVGE infected ones (47.3 vs 36.7 euros, p = 0.011). Vaccinated children suffered less clinical symptoms and no hospitalization. Therefore, vaccination decreases the psychosocial stressors caused by the disease in the family. Rotavirus infections are responsible for a substantial proportion of AGE cases in children ≤3 years of age in Spain attended at primary care visits. RVGE episodes are associated with greater clinical severity, greater alterations in the child´s behaviour, and higher parental distress. The outcomes of the present study recommend that routine rotavirus vaccination in infants ≤3 years of age could considerably reduce the serious burden of this potentially serious childhood disease.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 55 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Spain 1 2%
Unknown 54 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 12 22%
Student > Bachelor 9 16%
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 15%
Researcher 6 11%
Student > Postgraduate 4 7%
Other 9 16%
Unknown 7 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 19 35%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 5 9%
Nursing and Health Professions 5 9%
Social Sciences 4 7%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 5%
Other 8 15%
Unknown 11 20%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 26 December 2016.
All research outputs
#3,777,976
of 8,822,256 outputs
Outputs from BMC Infectious Diseases
#1,392
of 3,904 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#120,511
of 301,635 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Infectious Diseases
#65
of 174 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,822,256 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 56th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,904 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.1. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 62% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 301,635 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 59% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 174 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 61% of its contemporaries.