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Basic and complex emotion recognition in children with autism: cross-cultural findings

Overview of attention for article published in Molecular Autism, December 2016
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  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (66th percentile)

Mentioned by

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6 tweeters

Citations

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81 Dimensions

Readers on

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275 Mendeley
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Title
Basic and complex emotion recognition in children with autism: cross-cultural findings
Published in
Molecular Autism, December 2016
DOI 10.1186/s13229-016-0113-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

Shimrit Fridenson-Hayo, Steve Berggren, Amandine Lassalle, Shahar Tal, Delia Pigat, Sven Bölte, Simon Baron-Cohen, Ofer Golan

Abstract

Children with autism spectrum conditions (ASC) have emotion recognition deficits when tested in different expression modalities (face, voice, body). However, these findings usually focus on basic emotions, using one or two expression modalities. In addition, cultural similarities and differences in emotion recognition patterns in children with ASC have not been explored before. The current study examined the similarities and differences in the recognition of basic and complex emotions by children with ASC and typically developing (TD) controls across three cultures: Israel, Britain, and Sweden. Fifty-five children with high-functioning ASC, aged 5-9, were compared to 58 TD children. On each site, groups were matched on age, sex, and IQ. Children were tested using four tasks, examining recognition of basic and complex emotions from voice recordings, videos of facial and bodily expressions, and emotional video scenarios including all modalities in context. Compared to their TD peers, children with ASC showed emotion recognition deficits in both basic and complex emotions on all three modalities and their integration in context. Complex emotions were harder to recognize, compared to basic emotions for the entire sample. Cross-cultural agreement was found for all major findings, with minor deviations on the face and body tasks. Our findings highlight the multimodal nature of ER deficits in ASC, which exist for basic as well as complex emotions and are relatively stable cross-culturally. Cross-cultural research has the potential to reveal both autism-specific universal deficits and the role that specific cultures play in the way empathy operates in different countries.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 6 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 275 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Denmark 1 <1%
Unknown 273 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 43 16%
Student > Ph. D. Student 42 15%
Student > Bachelor 38 14%
Researcher 25 9%
Unspecified 17 6%
Other 49 18%
Unknown 61 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 95 35%
Neuroscience 21 8%
Unspecified 19 7%
Computer Science 14 5%
Social Sciences 13 5%
Other 45 16%
Unknown 68 25%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 February 2017.
All research outputs
#6,331,475
of 20,927,597 outputs
Outputs from Molecular Autism
#443
of 635 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#135,246
of 416,457 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Molecular Autism
#29
of 41 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 20,927,597 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 69th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 635 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 28.7. This one is in the 29th percentile – i.e., 29% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 416,457 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 66% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 41 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 29th percentile – i.e., 29% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.