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The utility of surgical lung biopsy in cancer patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Cardiothoracic Surgery, May 2013
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Mentioned by

twitter
4 tweeters

Citations

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1 Dimensions

Readers on

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17 Mendeley
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Title
The utility of surgical lung biopsy in cancer patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome
Published in
Journal of Cardiothoracic Surgery, May 2013
DOI 10.1186/1749-8090-8-128
Pubmed ID
Authors

Chih-Hao Chang, Kuo-Chin Kao, Han-Chung Hu, Chen-Yiu Hung, Li-Fu Li, Ching-Yang Wu, Chih-Wei Wang, Jui-Ying Fu, Chung-Chi Huang, Ning-Hung Chen, Cheng-Ta Yang, Ying-Huang Tsai

Abstract

BACKGROUND: This retrospective study evaluated the utility and safety of surgical lung biopsy (SLB) in cancer patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). METHODS: All cases of critically ill patients with cancer and diagnosed with ARDS who underwent SLB in a tertiary care hospital from January 2002 to July 2009 were reviewed. Clinical data including patient baseline characteristics, surgical complications, pathological findings, treatment alterations, and survival outcomes were retrospectively collected and analyzed. RESULTS: A total of 16 critically ill patients with cancer diagnosed with ARDS who underwent SLB were enrolled. The meantime from ARDS onset to SLB was 3.0 +/- 1.5 days. All SLB specimens offered a pathological diagnosis, and specific diagnoses were made in 9 of 16 patients. Biopsy findings resulted in a change in therapy in 11 of 16 patients. Overall, the SLB surgical complication rate was 19% (3/16). SLB did not directly cause the observed operative mortality. The ICU mortality rate was 38% (6/16). Patients who switched therapies after SLB had a trend toward decreased mortality than patients without a change in therapy (27% versus 60%; P = 0.299). CONCLUSIONS: In selected critically ill cancer patients with ARDS, SLB had a high diagnostic yield rate and an acceptable surgical complication rate.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 17 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 17 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 4 24%
Student > Postgraduate 2 12%
Professor 2 12%
Student > Bachelor 2 12%
Student > Doctoral Student 1 6%
Other 3 18%
Unknown 3 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 7 41%
Physics and Astronomy 1 6%
Psychology 1 6%
Sports and Recreations 1 6%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 6%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 6 35%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 28 July 2020.
All research outputs
#10,517,187
of 18,439,562 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Cardiothoracic Surgery
#175
of 925 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#82,292
of 168,686 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Cardiothoracic Surgery
#1
of 6 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 18,439,562 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 41st percentile – i.e., 41% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 925 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.4. This one has done well, scoring higher than 80% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 168,686 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 49th percentile – i.e., 49% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 6 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them