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Mitogenomic sequences and evidence from unique gene rearrangements corroborate evolutionary relationships of myctophiformes (Neoteleostei)

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Evolutionary Biology, January 2013
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  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (73rd percentile)

Mentioned by

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3 tweeters
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page

Citations

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42 Dimensions

Readers on

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47 Mendeley
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Title
Mitogenomic sequences and evidence from unique gene rearrangements corroborate evolutionary relationships of myctophiformes (Neoteleostei)
Published in
BMC Evolutionary Biology, January 2013
DOI 10.1186/1471-2148-13-111
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jan Y Poulsen, Ingvar Byrkjedal, Endre Willassen, David Rees, Hirohiko Takeshima, Takashi P Satoh, Gento Shinohara, Mutsumi Nishida, Masaki Miya

Abstract

A skewed assemblage of two epi-, meso- and bathypelagic fish families makes up the order Myctophiformes - the blackchins Neoscopelidae and the lanternfishes Myctophidae. The six rare neoscopelids show few morphological specializations whereas the divergent myctophids have evolved into about 250 species, of which many show massive abundances and wide distributions. In fact, Myctophidae is by far the most abundant fish family in the world, with plausible estimates of more than half of the oceans combined fish biomass. Myctophids possess a unique communication system of species-specific photophore patterns and traditional intrafamilial classification has been established to reflect arrangements of photophores. Myctophids present the most diverse array of larval body forms found in fishes although this attribute has both corroborated and confounded phylogenetic hypotheses based on adult morphology. No molecular phylogeny is available for Myctophiformes, despite their importance within all ocean trophic cycles, open-ocean speciation and as an important part of neoteleost divergence. This study attempts to resolve major myctophiform phylogenies from both mitogenomic sequences and corroborating evidence in the form of unique mitochondrial gene order rearrangements.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 47 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 2%
United States 1 2%
Norway 1 2%
Unknown 44 94%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 10 21%
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 13%
Student > Master 6 13%
Professor 4 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 9%
Other 8 17%
Unknown 9 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 22 47%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 5 11%
Environmental Science 4 9%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 3 6%
Physics and Astronomy 2 4%
Other 2 4%
Unknown 9 19%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 5. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 March 2014.
All research outputs
#5,135,753
of 19,096,926 outputs
Outputs from BMC Evolutionary Biology
#1,194
of 2,843 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#43,346
of 168,932 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Evolutionary Biology
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 19,096,926 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 72nd percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,843 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.9. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 57% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 168,932 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 73% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them