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Smoking and alcohol consumption patterns among elderly Canadians with mobility disabilities

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Research Notes, June 2013
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3 tweeters

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8 Dimensions

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42 Mendeley
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Title
Smoking and alcohol consumption patterns among elderly Canadians with mobility disabilities
Published in
BMC Research Notes, June 2013
DOI 10.1186/1756-0500-6-218
Pubmed ID
Authors

Fang Liu, Jennifer Woodrow, Angela Loucks-Atkinson, Sharon Buehler, Roy West, Peizhong Peter Wang

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Mobility disability is a major adverse health outcome associated with aging and an impediment to older adults' well-being and behaviors in social and leisure activities. It has been shown that lifestyle factors, including smoking and alcohol consumption, have been used as coping strategies to deal with the negative impact of disability. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of smoking and alcohol consumption among older Canadians with different levels of mobility disabilities and to examine factors associated with these two lifestyle patterns among those with disabilities. METHODS: Secondary data analysis was performed using individuals (n = 6,038) aged 65 years and older from both the 2001 Participation and Activity Limitation Survey and the 2003 Canadian Community Health Survey. Multivariate logistic regressions examined the relationship between disability severity and smoking as well as alcohol consumption while controlling for potential confounding socioeconomic factors. RESULTS: The proportion of current smokers among seniors with less-severe and more-severe mobility disabilities and those in the general population was comparable with 12.55%, 11.57% and 11.93%, respectively. Forty-eight percent of seniors in the general population consumed alcohol regularly, compared to only 12.85% with more-severe mobility disabilities. No significant association was shown between the severity level of mobility disabilities and smoking (odds ratio = 0.90, 95% confidence interval: 0.75, 1.08). However, seniors having more-severe disability were less likely to consume alcohol regularly (odds ratio = 0.76, 95% confidence interval: 0.65, 0.89). Other variables including age, gender, income, living status, and social participation also impacted these lifestyle patterns among the study population. CONCLUSIONS: Smoking and alcohol patterns present different associations with the severity level of mobility disabilities. Compared with the general population, elderly Canadians with mobility disabilities had similar smoking prevalence but differ significantly in terms of alcohol consumption. Results from this research will be relevant to decision makers involved in program planning, health education, and policy development as it pertains to the prevention and management of age-related disability.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 42 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 42 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 9 21%
Student > Doctoral Student 6 14%
Researcher 6 14%
Student > Bachelor 5 12%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 12%
Other 6 14%
Unknown 5 12%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 11 26%
Nursing and Health Professions 9 21%
Social Sciences 6 14%
Psychology 4 10%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 5%
Other 4 10%
Unknown 6 14%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 05 June 2013.
All research outputs
#13,873,783
of 21,346,872 outputs
Outputs from BMC Research Notes
#2,043
of 4,124 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#102,264
of 175,108 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Research Notes
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,346,872 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 32nd percentile – i.e., 32% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,124 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.3. This one is in the 46th percentile – i.e., 46% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 175,108 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 39th percentile – i.e., 39% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them