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Household medical waste disposal policy in Israel

Overview of attention for article published in Israel Journal of Health Policy Research, October 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#25 of 247)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (80th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (87th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet

Citations

dimensions_citation
24 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
124 Mendeley
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Title
Household medical waste disposal policy in Israel
Published in
Israel Journal of Health Policy Research, October 2016
DOI 10.1186/s13584-016-0108-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Zohar Barnett-Itzhaki, Tamar Berman, Itamar Grotto, Eyal Schwartzberg

Abstract

Large amounts of expired and unused medications accumulate in households. This potentially exposes the public to hazards due to uncontrolled use of medications. Most of the expired or unused medications that accumulate in households (household medical waste) is thrown to the garbage or flushed down to the sewage, potentially contaminating waste-water, water resources and even drinking water. There is evidence that pharmaceutical active ingredients reach the environment, including food, however the risk to public health from low level exposure to pharmaceuticals in the environment is currently unknown. In Israel, there is no legislation regarding household medical waste collection and disposal. Furthermore, only less than 14 % of Israelis return unused medications to Health Maintenance Organization (HMO) pharmacies. In this study, we investigated world-wide approaches and programs for household medical waste collection and disposal. In many countries around the world there are programs for household medical waste collection. In many countries there is legislation to address the issue of household medical waste, and this waste is collected in hospitals, clinics, law enforcement agencies and pharmacies. Furthermore, in many countries, medication producers and pharmacies pay for the collection and destruction of household medical waste, following the "polluter pays" principle. Several approaches and methods should be considered in Israel: (a) legislation and regulation to enable a variety of institutes to collect household medical waste (b) implementing the "polluter pays" principle and enforcing medical products manufactures to pay for the collection and destruction of household medical waste. (c) Raising awareness of patients, pharmacists, and other medical health providers regarding the health and environmental risks in accumulation of drugs and throwing them to the garbage, sink or toilet. (d) Adding specific instructions regarding disposal of the drug, in the medication label and leaflet. (e) Examining incentives for returning medications to pharmacies. (f) Examining drug collection from deceased in retirement homes and hospitals.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 124 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 124 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 21 17%
Student > Bachelor 19 15%
Student > Ph. D. Student 12 10%
Researcher 8 6%
Lecturer 6 5%
Other 22 18%
Unknown 36 29%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 21 17%
Medicine and Dentistry 16 13%
Environmental Science 13 10%
Nursing and Health Professions 7 6%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 5 4%
Other 23 19%
Unknown 39 31%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 8. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 09 January 2017.
All research outputs
#1,214,376
of 8,875,848 outputs
Outputs from Israel Journal of Health Policy Research
#25
of 247 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#57,364
of 301,391 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Israel Journal of Health Policy Research
#2
of 16 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,875,848 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 86th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 247 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.9. This one has done well, scoring higher than 89% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 301,391 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 80% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 16 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 87% of its contemporaries.