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Functional significance of CD105-positive cells in papillary renal cell carcinoma

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Cancer, January 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (54th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (57th percentile)

Mentioned by

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2 tweeters

Citations

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16 Dimensions

Readers on

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24 Mendeley
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Title
Functional significance of CD105-positive cells in papillary renal cell carcinoma
Published in
BMC Cancer, January 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12885-016-2985-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Damian Matak, Klaudia K. Brodaczewska, Cezary Szczylik, Irena Koch, Adam Myszczyszyn, Monika Lipiec, Slawomir Lewicki, Lukasz Szymanski, Robert Zdanowski, Anna M. Czarnecka

Abstract

CD105 was postulated as a renal cell carcinoma (RCC) stem cell marker, and CD133 as a putative RCC progenitor. Hypoxia, a natural microenvironment that prevails in tumors, was also incorporated into the study, especially in terms of the promotion of hypothetical stem-like cell properties. Within this study, we verify the existence of CD105+ and CD133+ populations in selected papillary subtype RCC (pRCC) cell lines. Both populations were analyzed for correlation with stem-like cell properties, such as stemness gene expression, and sphere and colony formation. For the preliminary analysis, several RCC cell lines were chosen (786-O, SMKT-R2, Caki-2, 796-P, ACHN, RCC6) and the control was human kidney cancer stem cells (HKCSC) and renal cells of embryonic origin (ASE-5063). Four cell lines were chosen for further investigation: Caki-2 (one of the highest numbers of CD105+ cells; primary origin), ACHN (a low number of CD105+ cells; metastatic origin), HKCSC (putative positive control), and ASE-5063 (additional control). In 769-P and RCC6, we could not detect a CD105+ population. Hypoxia variously affects pRCC cell growth, and mainly diminishes the stem-like properties of cells. Furthermore, we could not observe the correlation of CD105 and/or CD133 expression with the enhancement of stem-like properties. Based on this analysis, CD105/CD133 cannot be validated as cancer stem cell markers of pRCC cell lines.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 24 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 24 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 21%
Researcher 5 21%
Student > Bachelor 4 17%
Librarian 1 4%
Professor 1 4%
Other 3 13%
Unknown 5 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 6 25%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 8%
Engineering 2 8%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 8%
Psychology 1 4%
Other 2 8%
Unknown 9 38%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 10 January 2017.
All research outputs
#4,052,599
of 8,882,101 outputs
Outputs from BMC Cancer
#1,114
of 3,668 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#132,422
of 301,871 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Cancer
#36
of 90 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,882,101 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 53rd percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,668 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.8. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 68% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 301,871 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 54% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 90 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 57% of its contemporaries.