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Short- and long-term effectiveness of a three-month individualized need-supportive physical activity counseling intervention at the workplace

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Public Health, January 2017
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Title
Short- and long-term effectiveness of a three-month individualized need-supportive physical activity counseling intervention at the workplace
Published in
BMC Public Health, January 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12889-016-3965-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Anass Arrogi, Astrid Schotte, An Bogaerts, Filip Boen, Jan Seghers

Abstract

The objective of the present study was to evaluate the short- and long-term intervention and mediation effects of a 3-month individualized need-supportive physical activity (PA) counseling intervention on employees' PA and sedentary behavior. Insufficiently active employees (n = 300; mean age 42 ± 9 years; 78% female) were recruited from a large pharmaceutical company in Flanders, Belgium. A quasi-experimental design was used in which the intervention group (N = 246) was recruited separately from the reference group (N = 54). Intervention group participants received a 3-month behavioral support intervention, which consisted of two one-hour face-to-face counseling sessions and three follow-up counseling contacts by e-mail or telephone at weeks three, six and nine. PA counseling, delivered by qualified PA counselors, aimed to satisfy participants' basic psychological needs for autonomy, competence, and relatedness. Reference group participants did not receive individualized PA counseling. Outcome measures included objectively assessed and self-reported PA and sedentary time and psychological need satisfaction. Assessments were held at baseline, immediately after the intervention (short-term) and 6 months post-intervention (long-term). Mixed model analyses and bootstrapping analyses were used to determine intervention and mediation effects, respectively. The intervention group increased weekday daily steps both in the short- and long-term, while the reference group showed reductions in daily step count (ES = .65 and ES = .48 in the short- and long-term, respectively). In the short-term, weekday moderate-to-vigorous PA increased more pronouncedly in the intervention group compared to the reference group (ES = .34). Moreover, the intervention group demonstrated reductions in self-reported sitting time during weekends both in the short- and long-term, whereas the reference group reported increased sitting time (ES = .44 and ES = .32 in the short- and long-term, respectively). Changes in perceived autonomy and competence need satisfaction mediated the long-term intervention effects on daily step count. A 3-month individualized need-supportive PA counseling intervention among employees resulted in significant and sustained improvements in weekday daily step count and in decreased self-reported sitting during weekends. Our findings contribute to the growing evidence of the long-term effectiveness of need-supportive PA counseling. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01759927 . Registered December 30, 2012.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 114 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Spain 1 <1%
France 1 <1%
Unknown 112 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 16 14%
Student > Master 15 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 11 10%
Researcher 10 9%
Student > Postgraduate 8 7%
Other 29 25%
Unknown 25 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 20 18%
Nursing and Health Professions 18 16%
Medicine and Dentistry 13 11%
Social Sciences 10 9%
Sports and Recreations 9 8%
Other 13 11%
Unknown 31 27%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 10 June 2017.
All research outputs
#6,246,953
of 11,342,318 outputs
Outputs from BMC Public Health
#4,793
of 7,741 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#138,588
of 317,074 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Public Health
#127
of 211 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,342,318 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 44th percentile – i.e., 44% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 7,741 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.1. This one is in the 36th percentile – i.e., 36% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 317,074 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 54% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 211 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.