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Reducing health inequities: the contribution of core public health services in BC

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Public Health, June 2013
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (82nd percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (67th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
10 tweeters
googleplus
1 Google+ user

Citations

dimensions_citation
23 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
212 Mendeley
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Title
Reducing health inequities: the contribution of core public health services in BC
Published in
BMC Public Health, June 2013
DOI 10.1186/1471-2458-13-550
Pubmed ID
Authors

Bernadette Pauly, Marjorie MacDonald, Trevor Hancock, Wanda Martin, Kathleen Perkin

Abstract

Within Canada, many public health leaders have long identified the importance of improving the health of all Canadians especially those who face social and economic disadvantages. Future improvements in population health will be achieved by promoting health equity through action on the social determinants of health. Many Canadian documents, endorsed by government and public health leaders, describe commitments to improving overall health and promoting health equity. Public health has an important role to play in strengthening action on the social determinants and promoting health equity. Currently, public health services in British Columbia are being reorganized and there is a unique opportunity to study the application of an equity lens in public health and the contribution of public health to reducing health inequities. Where applicable, we have chosen mental health promotion, prevention of mental disorders and harms of substance use as exemplars within which to examine specific application of an equity lens.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 10 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 212 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 3 1%
Canada 3 1%
Peru 1 <1%
South Africa 1 <1%
Unknown 204 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 44 21%
Researcher 31 15%
Student > Ph. D. Student 25 12%
Other 15 7%
Student > Doctoral Student 13 6%
Other 41 19%
Unknown 43 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 50 24%
Social Sciences 45 21%
Nursing and Health Professions 32 15%
Psychology 7 3%
Computer Science 3 1%
Other 22 10%
Unknown 53 25%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 7. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 26 March 2014.
All research outputs
#2,066,769
of 12,372,633 outputs
Outputs from BMC Public Health
#2,434
of 8,418 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#25,815
of 146,795 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Public Health
#9
of 28 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,372,633 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 83rd percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 8,418 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.7. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 71% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 146,795 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 82% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 28 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 67% of its contemporaries.