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The effectiveness of critical time intervention for abused women and homeless people leaving Dutch shelters: study protocol of two randomised controlled trials

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Public Health, June 2013
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  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (68th percentile)

Mentioned by

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6 tweeters

Citations

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24 Dimensions

Readers on

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157 Mendeley
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Title
The effectiveness of critical time intervention for abused women and homeless people leaving Dutch shelters: study protocol of two randomised controlled trials
Published in
BMC Public Health, June 2013
DOI 10.1186/1471-2458-13-555
Pubmed ID
Authors

Danielle AM Lako, Renée de Vet, Mariëlle D Beijersbergen, Daniel B Herman, Albert M van Hemert, Judith RLM Wolf

Abstract

One of the main priorities of Dutch organisations providing shelter services is to develop evidence-based interventions in the care for abused women and homeless people. To date, most of these organisations have not used specific intervention models and the interventions which have been implemented rarely have an empirical and theoretical foundation. The present studies aim to examine the effectiveness of critical time intervention (CTI) for abused women and homeless people. In two multi-centre randomised controlled trials we investigate whether CTI, a time-limited (nine month) outreach intervention, is more effective than care-as-usual for abused women and homeless people making the transition from shelter facilities to supported or independent housing. Participants were recruited in 19 women's shelter facilities and 22 homeless shelter facilities across The Netherlands and randomly allocated to the intervention group (CTI) or the control group (care-as-usual). They were interviewed four times in nine months: once before leaving the shelter, and then at three, six and nine months after leaving the shelter. Quality of life (primary outcome for abused women) and recurrent loss of housing (primary outcome for homeless people) as well as secondary outcomes (e.g. care needs, self-esteem, loneliness, social support, substance use, psychological distress and service use) were assessed during the interviews. In addition, the model integrity of CTI was investigated during the data collection period. Based on international research CTI is expected to be an appropriate intervention for clients making the transition from institutional to community living. If CTI proves to be effective for abused women and homeless people, shelter services could include this case management model in their professional standards and improve the (quality of) services for clients. NTR3463 and NTR3425.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 6 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 157 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Malaysia 1 <1%
Canada 1 <1%
Unknown 155 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 28 18%
Student > Ph. D. Student 21 13%
Researcher 19 12%
Student > Doctoral Student 16 10%
Student > Bachelor 8 5%
Other 25 16%
Unknown 40 25%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 38 24%
Social Sciences 27 17%
Medicine and Dentistry 25 16%
Nursing and Health Professions 10 6%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 2%
Other 9 6%
Unknown 45 29%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 28 June 2013.
All research outputs
#6,615,223
of 21,346,872 outputs
Outputs from BMC Public Health
#7,056
of 13,834 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#55,034
of 175,360 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Public Health
#3
of 3 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,346,872 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 68th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 13,834 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 13.7. This one is in the 48th percentile – i.e., 48% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 175,360 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 68% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 3 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one.