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Bacterial etiology of bloodstream infections and antimicrobial resistance in Dhaka, Bangladesh, 2005–2014

Overview of attention for article published in Antimicrobial Resistance and Infection Control, January 2017
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  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

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8 tweeters

Citations

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17 Dimensions

Readers on

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66 Mendeley
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Title
Bacterial etiology of bloodstream infections and antimicrobial resistance in Dhaka, Bangladesh, 2005–2014
Published in
Antimicrobial Resistance and Infection Control, January 2017
DOI 10.1186/s13756-016-0162-z
Pubmed ID
Authors

Dilruba Ahmed, Md Ausrafuggaman Nahid, Abdullah Bashar Sami, Farhana Halim, Nasrin Akter, Tuhin Sadique, Md Sohel Rana, Md Shahriar Bin Elahi, Md Mahbubur Rahman

Abstract

Bloodstream infections due to bacterial pathogens are a major cause of morbidity and mortality in Bangladesh and other developing countries. In these countries, most patients are treated empirically based on their clinical symptoms. Therefore, up to date etiological data for major pathogens causing bloodstream infections may play a positive role in better healthcare management. The aim of this study was to identify the bacterial pathogens causing major bloodstream infections in Dhaka, Bangladesh and determine their antibiotic susceptibility pattern. From January 2005 to December 2014, a total of 103,679 single bottle blood samples were collected from both hospitalized and domiciliary patients attending Dhaka hospital, icddrb, Bangladesh All the blood samples were processed for culture using a BACT/Alert blood culture machine. Further identification of bacterial pathogens and their antimicrobial susceptibility test were performed using standard microbiological procedures. Overall, 13.6% of the cultured blood samples were positive and Gram-negative (72.1%) bacteria were predominant throughout the study period. Salmonella Typhi was the most frequently isolated organism (36.9% of samples) in this study and a high percentage of those strains were multidrug-resistant (MDR). However, a decreasing trend in the S. Typhi isolation rate was observed and, noticeably, the percentage of MDR S. Typhi isolated declined sharply over the study period. An overall increase in the presence of Gram-positive bacteria was observed, but most significantly we observed the percentage of MDR Gram-positive bacteria to double over the study period. Overall, Gram positive bacteria were more resistant to most of the commonly used antibiotics than Gram-negative bacteria, but the MDR level was high in both groups. This study identified the major bacterial pathogens involved with BSI in Dhaka, Bangladesh and also revealed their antibiotic susceptibility patterns. We expect our findings to help healthcare professionals to make informed decisions and provide better care for their patients. Also, we hope this study will assist researchers and policy makers to prioritize their research options to face the future challenges of infectious diseases.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 8 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 66 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 66 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 12 18%
Student > Master 11 17%
Researcher 10 15%
Student > Ph. D. Student 10 15%
Student > Postgraduate 5 8%
Other 9 14%
Unknown 9 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 20 30%
Immunology and Microbiology 7 11%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 7 11%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 5 8%
Nursing and Health Professions 4 6%
Other 8 12%
Unknown 15 23%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 5. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 06 February 2017.
All research outputs
#4,398,841
of 16,405,048 outputs
Outputs from Antimicrobial Resistance and Infection Control
#463
of 947 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#113,303
of 390,726 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Antimicrobial Resistance and Infection Control
#30
of 54 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 16,405,048 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 73rd percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 947 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 16.5. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 50% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 390,726 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 70% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 54 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 44th percentile – i.e., 44% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.