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Clade C HIV-1 isolates circulating in Southern Africa exhibit a greater frequency of dicysteine motif-containing Tat variants than those in Southeast Asia and cause increased neurovirulence

Overview of attention for article published in Retrovirology, June 2013
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#35 of 1,092)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (95th percentile)

Mentioned by

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41 tweeters

Citations

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49 Dimensions

Readers on

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83 Mendeley
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Title
Clade C HIV-1 isolates circulating in Southern Africa exhibit a greater frequency of dicysteine motif-containing Tat variants than those in Southeast Asia and cause increased neurovirulence
Published in
Retrovirology, June 2013
DOI 10.1186/1742-4690-10-61
Pubmed ID
Authors

Vasudev R Rao, Ujjwal Neogi, Joshua S Talboom, Ligia Padilla, Mustafizur Rahman, Cari Fritz-French, Sandra Gonzalez-Ramirez, Anjali Verma, Charles Wood, Ruth M Ruprecht, Udaykumar Ranga, Tasnim Azim, John Joska, Eliseo Eugenin, Anita Shet, Heather Bimonte-Nelson, William R Tyor, Vinayaka R Prasad

Abstract

HIV-1 Clade C (Subtype C; HIV-1C) is responsible for greater than 50% of infections worldwide. Unlike clade B HIV-1 (Subtype B; HIV-1B), which is known to cause HIV associated dementia (HAD) in approximately 15% to 30% of the infected individuals, HIV-1C has been linked with lower prevalence of HAD (0 to 6%) in India and Ethiopia. However, recent studies report a higher prevalence of HAD in South Africa, Zambia and Botswana, where HIV-1C infections predominate. Therefore, we examined whether Southern African HIV-1C is genetically distinct and investigated its neurovirulence. HIV-1 Tat protein is a viral determinant of neurocognitive dysfunction. Therefore, we focused our study on the variations seen in tat gene and its contribution to HIV associated neuropathogenesis.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 41 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 83 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 1%
South Africa 1 1%
Unknown 81 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 15 18%
Student > Ph. D. Student 12 14%
Student > Bachelor 11 13%
Student > Master 10 12%
Student > Postgraduate 8 10%
Other 9 11%
Unknown 18 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 24 29%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 11 13%
Immunology and Microbiology 5 6%
Psychology 5 6%
Nursing and Health Professions 4 5%
Other 13 16%
Unknown 21 25%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 34. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 21 December 2021.
All research outputs
#953,140
of 22,106,685 outputs
Outputs from Retrovirology
#35
of 1,092 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#7,620
of 176,296 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Retrovirology
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,106,685 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 95th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,092 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.4. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 176,296 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them