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Carriage of antibiotic-resistant Enterobacteriaceae in hospitalised children in tertiary hospitals in Harare, Zimbabwe

Overview of attention for article published in Antimicrobial Resistance and Infection Control, January 2017
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61 Mendeley
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Title
Carriage of antibiotic-resistant Enterobacteriaceae in hospitalised children in tertiary hospitals in Harare, Zimbabwe
Published in
Antimicrobial Resistance and Infection Control, January 2017
DOI 10.1186/s13756-016-0155-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Marcelyn T. Magwenzi, Muchaneta Gudza-Mugabe, Hilda A. Mujuru, Mutsa Dangarembizi-Bwakura, Valerie Robertson, Alexander M. Aiken

Abstract

Extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing and gentamicin resistant Enterobacteriaceae are increasingly recognised as a major cause of infection in low-income countries. We assessed the prevalence of gastrointestinal carriage of these bacteria in hospitalised children in Harare, Zimbabwe. We conducted a cohort study in paediatric inpatients at two tertiary-referral hospitals between May and July 2015. Rectal swabs and faecal samples were collected within 24 h of admission and further follow-up samples were collected on alternate days during hospitalization. Disc-based, selective and enrichment methods were used to detect carriage of these two forms of resistance. Standard methods were used to confirm resistance status and determine the susceptibility of resistant isolates to other commonly-used antibiotics. One hundred and sixty four paediatric inpatient admissions (median age = 1.0 year, IQR = 0.2-2.2years) were enrolled, and an average of 1.9 faecal samples per patient were collected. On admission, 68/164 (41%) patients had both ESBL and gentamicin-resistant Enterobacteriaceae detected, 18 (11%) had ESBL only, 17 (10%) had gentamicin resistance only and 61 (37%) had negative screening for both forms of resistance. During hospitalisation, 32/164 (20%) patients were found to have a type of resistant organism which was not present in their admission sample. We found that faecal samples and use of a selective enrichment broth enhanced the detection of resistant organisms. Amongst resistant bacteria isolated, there were high levels of resistance to ciprofloxacin and chloramphenicol, but not ertapenem. More than half of children had enteric carriage of a clinically-relevant form of antibiotic resistance on admission to public-sector hospitals in urban Zimbabwe. Additionally, a fifth of children acquired a further form of resistance during hospitalisation. Urgent action is needed to tackle the spread of antibiotic resistant enteric bacteria in African hospitals.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 61 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 61 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 11 18%
Student > Master 10 16%
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 13%
Student > Bachelor 6 10%
Student > Postgraduate 6 10%
Other 6 10%
Unknown 14 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 11 18%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 7 11%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 5 8%
Immunology and Microbiology 5 8%
Nursing and Health Professions 4 7%
Other 10 16%
Unknown 19 31%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 February 2017.
All research outputs
#4,610,671
of 8,993,272 outputs
Outputs from Antimicrobial Resistance and Infection Control
#310
of 388 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#157,141
of 305,759 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Antimicrobial Resistance and Infection Control
#30
of 35 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,993,272 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 46th percentile – i.e., 46% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 388 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 16.2. This one is in the 17th percentile – i.e., 17% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 305,759 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 44th percentile – i.e., 44% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 35 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 14th percentile – i.e., 14% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.