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Effect of transcutaneous electrical acupoint stimulation combined with palonosetron on chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting: a single-blind, randomized, controlled trial

Overview of attention for article published in Ai zheng Aizheng Chinese journal of cancer, January 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (62nd percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (79th percentile)

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4 tweeters
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2 Facebook pages

Citations

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24 Dimensions

Readers on

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102 Mendeley
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Title
Effect of transcutaneous electrical acupoint stimulation combined with palonosetron on chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting: a single-blind, randomized, controlled trial
Published in
Ai zheng Aizheng Chinese journal of cancer, January 2017
DOI 10.1186/s40880-016-0176-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jing Xie, Lei-Hua Chen, Zhou-Yu Ning, Chen-Yue Zhang, Hao Chen, Zhen Chen, Zhi-Qiang Meng, Xiao-Yan Zhu

Abstract

Chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting adversely affects the quality of life of patients who receive chemotherapy via intravenous infusion or transcatheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE). This study aimed to investigate the clinical effects of transcutaneous electrical acupoint stimulation (TEAS) on nausea and vomiting after TACE. A total of 142 patients who received TACE with cisplatin for primary or metastatic liver cancer were assigned to the active-acupuncture (n = 72) or placebo-acupuncture (n = 70) groups using a covariate-adaptive randomization at a ratio of 1:1. The acupoints Hegu (LI4), Neiguan (P6), and Zusanli (ST36) were stimulated twice daily for 6 days. The effects of TEAS on nausea and vomiting were assessed by using occurrence rate and severity of these symptoms. Anorexia scale and M. D. Anderson Symptom Inventory (MDASI) scores were secondary endpoints and were used to assess the effect of TEAS on patient appetite and quality of life. The safety of the treatments was also monitored. Between the two groups, the differences in occurrence rates and severities of nausea and vomiting after TACE were not significant (all P > 0.05). From the second day after TACE, anorexia scores were significantly lower in the active-acupuncture group than in the placebo-acupuncture group and continued to decrease over time with treatment (all P values less than 0.01). On days 0, 1, and 2, the mean MDASI scores for the active-acupuncture group were slightly lower than those for the placebo-acupuncture group, but the differences were not statistically significant (all P > 0.05). No significant differences were found between the two groups in the occurrence rate of any adverse event (P > 0.05). TEAS appears to be a safe and effective therapy to relieve patients' gastrointestinal discomfort after chemotherapy. Trial registration NCT01895010. Registered 21 June 2013.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 102 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 102 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 20 20%
Student > Master 13 13%
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 7%
Other 7 7%
Student > Postgraduate 6 6%
Other 16 16%
Unknown 33 32%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 27 26%
Nursing and Health Professions 23 23%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 5 5%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 2 2%
Arts and Humanities 2 2%
Other 9 9%
Unknown 34 33%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 29 September 2018.
All research outputs
#6,844,965
of 13,571,692 outputs
Outputs from Ai zheng Aizheng Chinese journal of cancer
#93
of 219 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#136,857
of 374,368 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Ai zheng Aizheng Chinese journal of cancer
#9
of 43 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,571,692 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 49th percentile – i.e., 49% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 219 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.1. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 57% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 374,368 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 62% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 43 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 79% of its contemporaries.