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Association between depression and fruit and vegetable consumption among adults in South Asia

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Psychiatry, January 2017
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  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (98th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (98th percentile)

Mentioned by

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17 tweeters
facebook
2 Facebook pages
googleplus
101 Google+ users

Citations

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43 Dimensions

Readers on

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138 Mendeley
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Title
Association between depression and fruit and vegetable consumption among adults in South Asia
Published in
BMC Psychiatry, January 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12888-017-1198-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Ghose Bishwajit, Daniel Peter O’Leary, Sharmistha Ghosh, Yaya Sanni, Tang Shangfeng, Feng Zhanchun

Abstract

In recent years there has been a growing research interest regarding the impact of dietary behaviour on mental health outcomes. The present study aimed to investigate the association between fruit and vegetable (F&V) consumption and depression in three south Asian countries- Bangladesh, India and Nepal. Cross-sectional data were obtained from World Health Survey of WHO conducted during 2002-04. In total 14,133 adult subjects (Bangladesh 3262, India 7594, Nepal 3277) aged 18 years and above were included in the study. Outcome variables were Self-Reported Depression (SRD) during last 30 days and 12 months. Multivariable regression methods were used to explore the association between F&V consumption and depression. Prevalence of Self-Reported Depression during past 12 months were respectively 39%, 17.7%, and 49.9% for Bangladesh, India and Nepal. In India, those who consumed less than five servings of vegetables were respectively 41% [AOR = 1.41; 95%CI = 0.60-3.33] and 57% [AOR = 1.57; 95%CI = 0.93-2.64] more likely to report severe-extreme and mild-moderate depression during past 30 days compared to those who consumed five servings a day. Regarding fruit consumption, compared to those who consumed five servings a day, the odds of severe-extreme and mild-moderate SRD were respectively 3.5 times [AOR = 3.48; 95%CI = 1.216-10.01] and 45% [AOR = 1.44; 95%CI = 0.89-2.32] higher in Bangladesh, and 2.9 times [AOR = 2.92; 95%CI = 1.12-7.64] and 42% higher [AOR = 1.41; 95%CI = 0.89-2.24] in Nepal compared to those who consumed less than five servings a day during last 30 days. Daily intake of less than five servings of F&V was associated with higher odds of depression. Nutrition programs aimed at promoting F&V consumption might prove beneficial to reduce the prevalence of depression in south Asian population. Further studies are required to understand the factors limiting the adequate consumption of F&V.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 17 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 138 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 138 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 25 18%
Student > Bachelor 25 18%
Researcher 10 7%
Student > Ph. D. Student 10 7%
Student > Postgraduate 9 7%
Other 12 9%
Unknown 47 34%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 24 17%
Medicine and Dentistry 21 15%
Psychology 11 8%
Social Sciences 8 6%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 6 4%
Other 16 12%
Unknown 52 38%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 114. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 12 September 2021.
All research outputs
#260,245
of 20,466,565 outputs
Outputs from BMC Psychiatry
#54
of 4,209 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#7,662
of 413,888 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Psychiatry
#7
of 385 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 20,466,565 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,209 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.4. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 413,888 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 385 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.