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Household dietary diversity and Animal Source Food consumption in Ethiopia: evidence from the 2011 Welfare Monitoring Survey

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Public Health, November 2016
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Title
Household dietary diversity and Animal Source Food consumption in Ethiopia: evidence from the 2011 Welfare Monitoring Survey
Published in
BMC Public Health, November 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12889-016-3861-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Abdulhalik Workicho, Tefera Belachew, Garumma Tolu Feyissa, Beyene Wondafrash, Carl Lachat, Roosmarijn Verstraeten, Patrick Kolsteren

Abstract

It is imperative to track dietary quality and progress in nutritional outcomes in a population to develop timely interventions. Dietary diversity is a commonly used proxy to assess dietary quality in low-income countries. This study identified predictors of household dietary diversity in Ethiopia and pattern of consumption of animal source food (ASF) among households. Secondary data were analyzed from the 2011 Ethiopian Welfare Monitoring Survey (WMS). This survey used a structured questionnaire to collect socio-demographic and economic data. Dietary data were collected using a dietary diversity questionnaire measuring dietary diversity over the past 1 week. A Household Dietary Diversity Score (HDDS) was constructed according to the Food and Agricultural Organization (FAO) guidelines. Consumption of ASFs is described by its distribution among the regions and by HDDS. Multiple logistic regression analysis was fitted to identify independent predictors for HDDS. A total of 27,995 households were included in the analyses. A little over half of the study households (52.2%) had more than four household members, and 75% of households were male headed. The mean HHDS was five food groups. Cereals were the most commonly (96%) consumed food groups. Fish, egg and fruits, on the other hand, were the least consumed food groups. ASFs were consumed in greater proportion among households with higher HDDS. Being part of the higher and middle socio economic strata (P < 0.001), literacy (P < 0.01), urban residence (P < 0.01), male headed household (P < 0.01), larger family size (P <0.01) and owning livestock (P < 0.01) were positively associated with higher HDDS. Considering these findings, nutrition sensitive interventions which address the problem through economic and educational empowerment and modern technologies supporting agricultural practices need to be designed to increase both local production and increased consumption.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 180 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 180 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 48 27%
Researcher 22 12%
Student > Ph. D. Student 21 12%
Student > Postgraduate 13 7%
Lecturer 10 6%
Other 32 18%
Unknown 34 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 36 20%
Social Sciences 26 14%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 26 14%
Medicine and Dentistry 15 8%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 9 5%
Other 20 11%
Unknown 48 27%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 23 February 2017.
All research outputs
#7,892,283
of 9,105,319 outputs
Outputs from BMC Public Health
#6,930
of 7,384 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#255,831
of 311,130 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Public Health
#172
of 181 outputs
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