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SLC11A1 polymorphisms and host susceptibility to cutaneous leishmaniasis in Pakistan

Overview of attention for article published in Parasites & Vectors, January 2017
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Title
SLC11A1 polymorphisms and host susceptibility to cutaneous leishmaniasis in Pakistan
Published in
Parasites & Vectors, January 2017
DOI 10.1186/s13071-016-1934-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Mariam Sophie, Abdul Hameed, Akhtar Muneer, Azam J. Samdani, Saima Saleem, Abid Azhar

Abstract

The vector-borne cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) is endemic in several regions of Pakistan mainly affecting poor populations. Host genetic factors, particularly SLC11A1 (solute carrier transmembrane protein) within macrophages, play a crucial role in disease pathology and susceptibility. Association of SLC11A1 with cutaneous leishmaniasis, a neglected tropical disease, is not well established. Inconsistencies have been observed within different populations worldwide with respect to genetic susceptibility. This study was designed to investigate genetic variation(s) in SLC11A1 and to assess possible association with cutaneous leishmaniasis in Pakistan. Eight polymorphisms (rs2276631, rs3731864, rs2290708, rs2695342, rs201565523, rs17215556, rs17235409, rs17235416) were genotyped across SLC11A1 in 274 patients and 119 healthy controls. Six polymorphisms were studied by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) and sequencing. Two single nucleotide polymorphisms were analyzed with newly designed semi-nested PCR assays. Case-control analysis showed no association between selected polymorphisms in SLC11A1 and cutaneous leishmaniasis. No significant difference was observed in the distribution of alleles between leishmaniasis patients and healthy individuals. Strong pairwise linkage disequilibrium was observed between rs2276631 and rs2290708 (r (2) = 64); and rs17235409 and rs17235416 (r (2) = 78). This study shows that genetic variations in the candidate gene SLC11A1 do not affect susceptibility to cutaneous leishmaniasis in the sample population from Pakistan.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 32 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 32 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 6 19%
Student > Bachelor 5 16%
Student > Postgraduate 4 13%
Student > Master 4 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 9%
Other 6 19%
Unknown 4 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 7 22%
Medicine and Dentistry 5 16%
Immunology and Microbiology 3 9%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 6%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 6%
Other 6 19%
Unknown 7 22%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 16 January 2017.
All research outputs
#9,083,298
of 11,346,162 outputs
Outputs from Parasites & Vectors
#2,086
of 2,826 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#225,287
of 319,995 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Parasites & Vectors
#78
of 109 outputs
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