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Evolution of gut microbiota composition from birth to 24 weeks in the INFANTMET Cohort

Overview of attention for article published in Microbiome, January 2017
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  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (96th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
blogs
2 blogs
policy
1 policy source
twitter
50 tweeters
facebook
4 Facebook pages
reddit
1 Redditor

Citations

dimensions_citation
263 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
576 Mendeley
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Title
Evolution of gut microbiota composition from birth to 24 weeks in the INFANTMET Cohort
Published in
Microbiome, January 2017
DOI 10.1186/s40168-016-0213-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Cian J. Hill, Denise B. Lynch, Kiera Murphy, Marynka Ulaszewska, Ian B. Jeffery, Carol Anne O’Shea, Claire Watkins, Eugene Dempsey, Fulvio Mattivi, Kieran Tuohy, R. Paul Ross, C. Anthony Ryan, Paul W. O’ Toole, Catherine Stanton

Abstract

The gut is the most extensively studied niche of the human microbiome. The aim of this study was to characterise the initial gut microbiota development of a cohort of breastfed infants (n = 192) from 1 to 24 weeks of age. V4-V5 region 16S rRNA amplicon Illumina sequencing and, in parallel, bacteriological culture. The metabolomic profile of infant urine at 4 weeks of age was also examined by LC-MS. Full-term (FT), spontaneous vaginally delivered (SVD) infants' microbiota remained stable at both phylum and genus levels during the 24-week period examined. FT Caesarean section (CS) infants displayed an increased faecal abundance of Firmicutes (p < 0.01) and lower abundance of Actinobacteria (p < 0.001) after the first week of life compared to FT-SVD infants. FT-CS infants gradually progressed to harbouring a microbiota closely resembling FT-SVD (which remained stable) by week 8 of life, which was maintained at week 24. The gut microbiota of preterm (PT) infants displayed a significantly greater abundance of Proteobacteria compared to FT infants (p < 0.001) at week 1. Metabolomic analysis of urine at week 4 indicated PT-CS infants have a functionally different metabolite profile than FT (both CS and SVD) infants. Co-inertia analysis showed co-variation between the urine metabolome and the faecal microbiota of the infants. Tryptophan and tyrosine metabolic pathways, as well as fatty acid and bile acid metabolism, were found to be affected by delivery mode and gestational age. These findings confirm that mode of delivery and gestational age both have significant effects on early neonatal microbiota composition. There is also a significant difference between the metabolite profile of FT and PT infants. Prolonged breastfeeding was shown to have a significant effect on the microbiota composition of FT-CS infants at 24 weeks of age, but interestingly not on that of FT-SVD infants. Twins had more similar microbiota to one another than between two random infants, reflecting the influence of similarities in both host genetics and the environment on the microbiota..

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 576 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 2 <1%
Brazil 1 <1%
France 1 <1%
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Denmark 1 <1%
Portugal 1 <1%
Unknown 569 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 91 16%
Student > Bachelor 90 16%
Student > Ph. D. Student 85 15%
Student > Master 83 14%
Student > Doctoral Student 35 6%
Other 87 15%
Unknown 105 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 100 17%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 90 16%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 88 15%
Immunology and Microbiology 54 9%
Nursing and Health Professions 39 7%
Other 75 13%
Unknown 130 23%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 59. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 26 November 2020.
All research outputs
#499,476
of 19,503,523 outputs
Outputs from Microbiome
#137
of 1,182 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#14,002
of 376,234 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Microbiome
#1
of 6 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 19,503,523 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 97th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,182 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 40.0. This one has done well, scoring higher than 88% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 376,234 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 6 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them