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Innate immunity based cancer immunotherapy: B16-F10 murine melanoma model

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Cancer, December 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (74th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (73rd percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog

Citations

dimensions_citation
11 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
29 Mendeley
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Title
Innate immunity based cancer immunotherapy: B16-F10 murine melanoma model
Published in
BMC Cancer, December 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12885-016-2982-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Veronika Caisová, Andra Vieru, Zuzana Kumžáková, Simona Glaserová, Hana Husníková, Nikol Vácová, Gabriela Krejčová, Lucie Paďouková, Ivana Jochmanová, Katherine I. Wolf, Jindřich Chmelař, Jan Kopecký, Jan Ženka

Abstract

Using killed microorganisms or their parts to stimulate immunity for cancer treatment dates back to the end of 19(th) century. Since then, it undergone considerable development. Our novel approach binds ligands to the tumor cell surface, which stimulates tumor phagocytosis. The therapeutic effect is further amplified by simultaneous application of agonists of Toll-like receptors. We searched for ligands that induce both a strong therapeutic effect and are safe for humans. B16-F10 murine melanoma model was used. For the stimulation of phagocytosis, mannan or N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine, was covalently bound to tumor cells or attached using hydrophobic anchor. The following agonists of Toll-like receptors were studied: monophosphoryl lipid A (MPLA), imiquimod (R-837), resiquimod (R-848), poly(I:C), and heat killed Listeria monocytogenes. R-848 proved to be the most suitable Toll-like receptor agonist for our novel immunotherapeutic approach. In combination with covalently bound mannan, R-848 significantly reduced tumor growth. Adding poly(I:C) and L. monocytogenes resulted in complete recovery in 83% of mice and in their protection from the re-transplantation of melanoma cells. An efficient cancer treatment results from the combination of Toll-like receptor agonists and phagocytosis stimulating ligands bound to the tumor cells.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 29 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 29 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 5 17%
Student > Bachelor 4 14%
Researcher 4 14%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 14%
Lecturer 1 3%
Other 4 14%
Unknown 7 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Immunology and Microbiology 8 28%
Medicine and Dentistry 3 10%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 7%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 7%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 2 7%
Other 5 17%
Unknown 7 24%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 6. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 18 January 2017.
All research outputs
#1,711,141
of 8,932,566 outputs
Outputs from BMC Cancer
#421
of 3,680 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#78,603
of 306,787 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Cancer
#21
of 78 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,932,566 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 80th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,680 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.8. This one has done well, scoring higher than 88% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 306,787 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 74% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 78 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 73% of its contemporaries.