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Cervical cancer risk factors among HIV-infected Nigerian women

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Public Health, June 2013
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  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (71st percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

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4 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

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40 Dimensions

Readers on

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211 Mendeley
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Title
Cervical cancer risk factors among HIV-infected Nigerian women
Published in
BMC Public Health, June 2013
DOI 10.1186/1471-2458-13-582
Pubmed ID
Authors

Uzoma Ononogbu, Maryam Almujtaba, Fatima Modibbo, Ishak Lawal, Richard Offiong, Olayinka Olaniyan, Patrick Dakum, Donna Spiegelman, William Blattner, Clement Adebamowo

Abstract

Cervical cancer is the third most common cancer among women worldwide, and in Nigeria it is the second most common female cancer. Cervical cancer is an AIDS-defining cancer; however, HIV only marginally increases the risk of cervical pre-cancer and cancer. In this study, we examine the risk factors for cervical pre-cancer and cancer among HIV-positive women screened for cervical cancer at two medical institutions in Abuja, Nigeria. A total of 2,501 HIV-positive women participating in the cervical cancer screen-and-treat program in Abuja, Nigeria consented to this study and provided socio-demographic and clinical information. Log-binomial models were used to calculate relative risk (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (95%CI) for the risk factors of cervical pre-cancer and cancer. There was a 6% prevalence of cervical pre-cancer and cancer in the study population of HIV-positive women. The risk of screening positivity or invasive cancer diagnosis reduced with increasing age, with women aged 40 years and older having the lowest risk (RR=0.4; 95%CI=0.2-0.7). Women with a CD4 count of 650 per mm3 or more also had lower risk of screening positivity or invasive cancer diagnosis (RR=0.3, 95%CI=0.2-0.6). Other factors such as having had 5 or more abortions (RR=1.8, 95%CI=1.0-3.6) and the presence of other vaginal wall abnormalities (RR=1.9, 95%CI=1.3-2.8) were associated with screening positivity or invasive cancer diagnosis. The prevalence of screening positive lesions or cervical cancer was lower than most previous reports from Africa. HIV-positive Nigerian women were at a marginally increased risk of cervical pre-cancer and cancer. These findings highlight the need for more epidemiological studies of cervical cancer and pre-cancerous lesions among HIV-positive women in Africa and an improved understanding of incidence and risk factors.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 211 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Nigeria 2 <1%
United States 1 <1%
Kenya 1 <1%
Tanzania, United Republic of 1 <1%
Unknown 206 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 56 27%
Student > Postgraduate 26 12%
Researcher 23 11%
Student > Ph. D. Student 23 11%
Student > Bachelor 18 9%
Other 28 13%
Unknown 37 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 85 40%
Nursing and Health Professions 42 20%
Social Sciences 12 6%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 5 2%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 2%
Other 18 9%
Unknown 45 21%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 15 July 2013.
All research outputs
#1,745,841
of 7,320,898 outputs
Outputs from BMC Public Health
#2,727
of 6,497 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#30,525
of 120,859 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Public Health
#128
of 248 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 7,320,898 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 62nd percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 6,497 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.3. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 53% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 120,859 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 71% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 248 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 47th percentile – i.e., 47% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.