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Exposure to wood smoke increases arterial stiffness and decreases heart rate variability in humans

Overview of attention for article published in Particle and Fibre Toxicology, June 2013
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#42 of 541)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (92nd percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
33 tweeters

Citations

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88 Dimensions

Readers on

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167 Mendeley
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Title
Exposure to wood smoke increases arterial stiffness and decreases heart rate variability in humans
Published in
Particle and Fibre Toxicology, June 2013
DOI 10.1186/1743-8977-10-20
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jon Unosson, Anders Blomberg, Thomas Sandström, Ala Muala, Christoffer Boman, Robin Nyström, Roger Westerholm, Nicholas L Mills, David E Newby, Jeremy P Langrish, Jenny A Bosson

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Emissions from biomass combustion are a major source of indoor and outdoor air pollution, and are estimated to cause millions of premature deaths worldwide annually. Whilst adverse respiratory health effects of biomass exposure are well established, less is known about its effects on the cardiovascular system. In this study we assessed the effect of exposure to wood smoke on heart rate, blood pressure, central arterial stiffness and heart rate variability in otherwise healthy persons. METHODS: Fourteen healthy non-smoking subjects participated in a randomized, double-blind crossover study. Subjects were exposed to dilute wood smoke (mean particle concentration of 314+/-38 mug/m3) or filtered air for three hours during intermittent exercise. Heart rate, blood pressure, central arterial stiffness and heart rate variability were measured at baseline and for one hour post-exposure. RESULTS: Central arterial stiffness, measured as augmentation index, augmentation pressure and pulse wave velocity, was higher after wood smoke exposure as compared to filtered air (p < 0.01 for all), and heart rate was increased (p < 0.01) although there was no effect on blood pressure. Heart rate variability (SDNN, RMSSD and pNN50; p = 0.003, p < 0.001 and p < 0.001 respectively) was decreased one hour following exposure to wood smoke compared to filtered air. CONCLUSIONS: Acute exposure to wood smoke as a model of exposure to biomass combustion is associated with an immediate increase in central arterial stiffness and a simultaneous reduction in heart rate variability. As biomass is used for cooking and heating by a large fraction of the global population and is currently advocated as a sustainable alternative energy source, further studies are required to establish its likely impact on cardiovascular disease.Trial registration: ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT01488500.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 33 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 167 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Brazil 2 1%
Zimbabwe 1 <1%
Germany 1 <1%
Peru 1 <1%
United States 1 <1%
Unknown 161 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 30 18%
Student > Master 26 16%
Researcher 18 11%
Student > Bachelor 14 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 9 5%
Other 27 16%
Unknown 43 26%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 36 22%
Environmental Science 16 10%
Engineering 14 8%
Nursing and Health Professions 10 6%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 9 5%
Other 35 21%
Unknown 47 28%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 20. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 17 January 2022.
All research outputs
#1,473,388
of 21,592,997 outputs
Outputs from Particle and Fibre Toxicology
#42
of 541 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#12,606
of 174,245 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Particle and Fibre Toxicology
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,592,997 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 93rd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 541 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 15.0. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 174,245 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them