↓ Skip to main content

Serotonin-secreting enteroendocrine cells respond via diverse mechanisms to acute and chronic changes in glucose availability

Overview of attention for article published in Nutrition & Metabolism, December 2015
Altmetric Badge

Mentioned by

twitter
1 tweeter

Citations

dimensions_citation
34 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
53 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Serotonin-secreting enteroendocrine cells respond via diverse mechanisms to acute and chronic changes in glucose availability
Published in
Nutrition & Metabolism, December 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12986-015-0051-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Leah Zelkas, Ravi Raghupathi, Amanda L. Lumsden, Alyce M. Martin, Emily Sun, Nick J. Spencer, Richard L. Young, Damien J. Keating

Abstract

Enteroendocrine cells collectively constitute our largest endocrine tissue, with serotonin (5-HT) secreting enterochromaffin (EC) cells being the largest component (~50 %). This gut-derived 5-HT has multiple paracrine and endocrine roles. EC cells are thought to act as nutrient sensors and luminal glucose is the major absorbed form of carbohydrate in the gut and activates secretion in an array of cell types. It is unknown whether EC cells release 5-HT in response to glucose in primary EC cells. Furthermore, fasting augments 5-HT synthesis and release into the circulation. However, which nutrients cause fasting-induced synthesis of EC cell 5-HT is unknown. Here we examine the effects of acute and chronic changes in glucose availability on 5-HT release from intact tissue and single EC cells. We utilised established approaches in our laboratories measuring 5-HT release in intact mouse colon with amperometry. We then examined single EC cells function using our published protocol in guinea-pig colon. Single cell Ca(2+) imaging and amperometry were used with these cells. Real-time PCR was used along with amperometry, on primary EC cells cultured for 24 h in 5 or 25 mM glucose. We demonstrate that acute increases in glucose, at levels found in the gut lumen rather than in plasma, trigger 5-HT release from intact colon, and cause Ca(2+) entry and 5-HT release in primary EC cells. Single cell amperometry demonstrates that high glucose increases the amount of 5-HT released from individual vesicles as they undergo exocytosis. Finally, 24 h incubation of EC cells in low glucose causes an increase in the transcription of the 5-HT synthesising enzyme Tph1 as well as increasing in 5-HT secretion in EC cells. We demonstrate that primary EC cells respond to acute changes in glucose availability through increases in intracellular Ca(2+) the activation of 5-HT secretion, but respond to chronic changes in glucose levels through the transcriptional regulation of Tph1 to alter 5-HT synthesis.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 53 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Brazil 1 2%
Unknown 52 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 13 25%
Researcher 10 19%
Student > Master 10 19%
Student > Bachelor 5 9%
Professor 3 6%
Other 2 4%
Unknown 10 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 15 28%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 11 21%
Medicine and Dentistry 11 21%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 2%
Immunology and Microbiology 1 2%
Other 4 8%
Unknown 10 19%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 14 March 2018.
All research outputs
#10,115,265
of 12,645,670 outputs
Outputs from Nutrition & Metabolism
#546
of 643 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#237,879
of 340,535 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Nutrition & Metabolism
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,645,670 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 10th percentile – i.e., 10% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 643 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 20.5. This one is in the 7th percentile – i.e., 7% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 340,535 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 17th percentile – i.e., 17% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them