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Incense smoke: clinical, structural and molecular effects on airway disease

Overview of attention for article published in Clinical and Molecular Allergy, April 2008
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • One of the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#7 of 214)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (98th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
twitter
35 tweeters
facebook
2 Facebook pages
googleplus
1 Google+ user
video
2 video uploaders

Citations

dimensions_citation
160 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
151 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
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Title
Incense smoke: clinical, structural and molecular effects on airway disease
Published in
Clinical and Molecular Allergy, April 2008
DOI 10.1186/1476-7961-6-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

Ta-Chang Lin, Guha Krishnaswamy, David S Chi

Abstract

In Asian countries where the Buddhism and Taoism are mainstream religions, incense burning is a daily practice. A typical composition of stick incense consists of 21% (by weight) of herbal and wood powder, 35% of fragrance material, 11% of adhesive powder, and 33% of bamboo stick. Incense smoke (fumes) contains particulate matter (PM), gas products and many organic compounds. On average, incense burning produces particulates greater than 45 mg/g burned as compared to 10 mg/g burned for cigarettes. The gas products from burning incense include CO, CO2, NO2, SO2, and others. Incense burning also produces volatile organic compounds, such as benzene, toluene, and xylenes, as well as aldehydes and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). The air pollution in and around various temples has been documented to have harmful effects on health. When incense smoke pollutants are inhaled, they cause respiratory system dysfunction. Incense smoke is a risk factor for elevated cord blood IgE levels and has been indicated to cause allergic contact dermatitis. Incense smoke also has been associated with neoplasm and extracts of particulate matter from incense smoke are found to be mutagenic in the Ames Salmonella test with TA98 and activation. In order to prevent airway disease and other health problem, it is advisable that people should reduce the exposure time when they worship at the temple with heavy incense smokes, and ventilate their house when they burn incense at home.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 35 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 151 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Chile 1 <1%
United States 1 <1%
Kenya 1 <1%
Unknown 148 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 22 15%
Student > Bachelor 21 14%
Student > Master 18 12%
Researcher 16 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 10 7%
Other 30 20%
Unknown 34 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 26 17%
Environmental Science 16 11%
Engineering 14 9%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 11 7%
Chemistry 9 6%
Other 32 21%
Unknown 43 28%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 44. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 10 January 2023.
All research outputs
#803,117
of 22,903,988 outputs
Outputs from Clinical and Molecular Allergy
#7
of 214 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#1,514
of 81,118 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Clinical and Molecular Allergy
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,903,988 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 96th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 214 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.0. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 81,118 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them