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Reproductive factors and the risk of triple-negative breast cancer in white women and African-American women: a pooled analysis

Overview of attention for article published in Breast Cancer Research, January 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (88th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Mentioned by

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20 tweeters
facebook
2 Facebook pages

Citations

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46 Dimensions

Readers on

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103 Mendeley
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Title
Reproductive factors and the risk of triple-negative breast cancer in white women and African-American women: a pooled analysis
Published in
Breast Cancer Research, January 2017
DOI 10.1186/s13058-016-0799-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

Huiyan Ma, Giske Ursin, Xinxin Xu, Eunjung Lee, Kayo Togawa, Lei Duan, Yani Lu, Kathleen E. Malone, Polly A. Marchbanks, Jill A. McDonald, Michael S. Simon, Suzanne G. Folger, Jane Sullivan-Halley, Dennis M. Deapen, Michael F. Press, Leslie Bernstein

Abstract

Early age at menarche, nulliparity, late age at first completed pregnancy, and never having breastfed, are established breast cancer risk factors. However, among breast cancer subtypes, it remains unclear whether all of these are risk factors for triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC). We evaluated the associations of these reproductive factors with TNBC, in 2658 patients with breast cancer (including 554 with TNBC) and 2448 controls aged 20-64 years, who participated in one of the three population-based case-control studies: the Women's Contraceptive and Reproductive Experiences Study, the Women's Breast Carcinoma in situ Study, or the Women's Learning the Influence of Family and Environment Study. We used multivariable polychotomous unconditional logistic regression methods to conduct case-control comparisons among breast cancer subtypes defined by estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, and human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 expression status. TNBC risk decreased with increasing duration of breastfeeding (P trend = 0.006), but age at menarche, age at first completed pregnancy, and nulliparity were not associated with risk of TNBC. Parous women who breastfed for at least one year had a 31% lower risk of TNBC than parous women who had never breastfed (odds ratio, OR = 0.69; 95% confidence interval, CI = 0.50-0.96). The association between breastfeeding and risk of TNBC was modified by age and race. Parous African-American women aged 20-44 years who breastfed for 6 months or longer had an 82% lower risk of TNBC than their counterparts who had never breastfed (OR = 0.18, 95% CI = 0.07-0.46). Our data indicate that breastfeeding decreases the risk of TNBC, especially for younger African-American women.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 20 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 103 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 103 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 17 17%
Student > Master 13 13%
Student > Bachelor 13 13%
Researcher 10 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 7 7%
Other 15 15%
Unknown 28 27%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 25 24%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 13 13%
Nursing and Health Professions 12 12%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 4 4%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 3%
Other 11 11%
Unknown 35 34%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 16. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 29 July 2020.
All research outputs
#1,568,244
of 18,447,634 outputs
Outputs from Breast Cancer Research
#159
of 1,748 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#41,769
of 371,180 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Breast Cancer Research
#1
of 5 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 18,447,634 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 91st percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,748 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.4. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 371,180 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 88% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 5 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them