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A(maize)ing attraction: gravid Anopheles arabiensis are attracted and oviposit in response to maize pollen odours

Overview of attention for article published in Malaria Journal, January 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (89th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
2 blogs
twitter
5 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

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33 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
73 Mendeley
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Title
A(maize)ing attraction: gravid Anopheles arabiensis are attracted and oviposit in response to maize pollen odours
Published in
Malaria Journal, January 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12936-016-1656-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Betelehem Wondwosen, Sharon R. Hill, Göran Birgersson, Emiru Seyoum, Habte Tekie, Rickard Ignell

Abstract

Maize cultivation contributes to the prevalence of malaria mosquitoes and exacerbates malaria transmission in sub-Saharan Africa. The pollen from maize serves as an important larval food source for Anopheles mosquitoes, and females that are able to detect breeding sites where maize pollen is abundant may provide their offspring with selective advantages. Anopheles mosquitoes are hypothesized to locate, discriminate among, and select such sites using olfactory cues, and that synthetic volatile blends can mimic these olfactory-guided behaviours. Two-port olfactometer and two-choice oviposition assays were used to assess the attraction and oviposition preference of gravid Anopheles arabiensis to the headspace of the pollen from two maize cultivars (BH-660 and ZM-521). Bioactive compounds were identified using combined gas chromatography and electroantennographic detection from the headspace of the cultivar found to be most attractive (BH-660). Synthetic blends of the volatile compounds were then assessed for attraction and oviposition preference of gravid An. arabiensis, as above. Here the collected headspace volatiles from the pollen of two maize cultivars was shown to differentially attract and stimulate oviposition in gravid An. arabiensis. Furthermore, a five-component synthetic maize pollen odour blend was identified, which elicited the full oviposition behavioural repertoire of the gravid mosquitoes. The cues identified from maize pollen provide important substrates for the development of novel control measures that modulate gravid female behaviour. Such measures are irrespective of indoor or outdoor feeding and resting patterns, thus providing a much-needed addition to the arsenal of tools that currently target indoor biting mosquitoes.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 73 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 73 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 16 22%
Researcher 14 19%
Student > Master 12 16%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 7%
Lecturer 5 7%
Other 12 16%
Unknown 9 12%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 25 34%
Environmental Science 6 8%
Medicine and Dentistry 6 8%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 5 7%
Neuroscience 5 7%
Other 14 19%
Unknown 12 16%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 16. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 16 April 2020.
All research outputs
#1,422,813
of 17,457,801 outputs
Outputs from Malaria Journal
#303
of 4,811 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#39,684
of 366,304 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Malaria Journal
#1
of 2 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,457,801 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 91st percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,811 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.1. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 366,304 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 89% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 2 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them