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Effects of General Anesthetics on Visceral Pain Transmission in the Spinal Cord

Overview of attention for article published in Molecular Pain, January 2008
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Title
Effects of General Anesthetics on Visceral Pain Transmission in the Spinal Cord
Published in
Molecular Pain, January 2008
DOI 10.1186/1744-8069-4-50
Pubmed ID
Authors

Yun Wang, Jing Wu, Qing Lin, HJ Nauta, Yun Yue, Li Fang

Abstract

Current evidence suggests an analgesic role for the spinal cord action of general anesthetics; however, the cellular population and intracellular mechanisms underlying anti-visceral pain by general anesthetics still remain unclear. It is known that visceral nociceptive signals are transmited via post-synaptic dorsal column (PSDC) and spinothalamic tract (STT) neuronal pathways and that the PSDC pathway plays a major role in visceral nociception. Animal studies report that persistent changes including nociception-associated molecular expression (e.g. neurokinin-1 (NK-1) receptors) and activation of signal transduction cascades (such as the protein kinase A [PKA]-c-AMP-responsive element binding [CREB] cascade)-in spinal PSDC neurons are observed following visceral pain stimulation. The clinical practice of interruption of the spinal PSDC pathway in patients with cancer pain further supports a role of this group of neurons in the development and maintenance of visceral pain. We propose the hypothesis that general anesthetics might affect critical molecular targets such as NK-1 and glutamate receptors, as well as intracellular signaling by CaM kinase II, protein kinase C (PKC), PKA, and MAP kinase cascades in PSDC neurons, which contribute to the neurotransmission of visceral pain signaling. This would help elucidate the mechanism of antivisceral nociception by general anesthetics at the cellular and molecular levels and aid in development of novel therapeutic strategies to improve clinical management of visceral pain.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 36 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 3%
Spain 1 3%
Mexico 1 3%
Germany 1 3%
Unknown 32 89%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 8 22%
Student > Master 7 19%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 8%
Student > Bachelor 3 8%
Professor 3 8%
Other 8 22%
Unknown 4 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 16 44%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 5 14%
Neuroscience 4 11%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 3%
Philosophy 1 3%
Other 4 11%
Unknown 5 14%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 22 June 2013.
All research outputs
#11,167,453
of 12,552,259 outputs
Outputs from Molecular Pain
#403
of 464 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#125,996
of 149,816 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Molecular Pain
#17
of 17 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,552,259 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 464 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.2. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 17 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.