↓ Skip to main content

Epigenome-wide association study of DNA methylation in panic disorder

Overview of attention for article published in Clinical Epigenetics, January 2017
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (55th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
5 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
39 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
72 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Epigenome-wide association study of DNA methylation in panic disorder
Published in
Clinical Epigenetics, January 2017
DOI 10.1186/s13148-016-0307-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Mihoko Shimada-Sugimoto, Takeshi Otowa, Taku Miyagawa, Tadashi Umekage, Yoshiya Kawamura, Miki Bundo, Kazuya Iwamoto, Mamoru Tochigi, Kiyoto Kasai, Hisanobu Kaiya, Hisashi Tanii, Yuji Okazaki, Katsushi Tokunaga, Tsukasa Sasaki

Abstract

Panic disorder (PD) is considered to be a multifactorial disorder emerging from interactions among multiple genetic and environmental factors. To date, although genetic studies reported several susceptibility genes with PD, few of them were replicated and the pathogenesis of PD remains to be clarified. Epigenetics is considered to play an important role in etiology of complex traits and diseases, and DNA methylation is one of the major forms of epigenetic modifications. In this study, we performed an epigenome-wide association study of PD using DNA methylation arrays so as to investigate the possibility that different levels of DNA methylation might be associated with PD. The DNA methylation levels of CpG sites across the genome were examined with genomic DNA samples (PD, N = 48, control, N = 48) extracted from peripheral blood. Methylation arrays were used for the analysis. β values, which represent the levels of DNA methylation, were normalized via an appropriate pipeline. Then, β values were converted to M values via the logit transformation for epigenome-wide association study. The relationship between each DNA methylation site and PD was assessed by linear regression analysis with adjustments for the effects of leukocyte subsets. Forty CpG sites showed significant association with PD at 5% FDR correction, though the differences of the DNA methylation levels were relatively small. Most of the significant CpG sites (37/40 CpG sites) were located in or around CpG islands. Many of the significant CpG sites (27/40 CpG sites) were located upstream of genes, and all such CpG sites with the exception of two were hypomethylated in PD subjects. A pathway analysis on the genes annotated to the significant CpG sites identified several pathways, including "positive regulation of lymphocyte activation." Although future studies with larger number of samples are necessary to confirm the small DNA methylation abnormalities associated with PD, there is a possibility that several CpG sites might be associated, together as a group, with PD.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 72 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 72 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 11 15%
Student > Master 11 15%
Student > Doctoral Student 9 13%
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 13%
Student > Bachelor 4 6%
Other 13 18%
Unknown 15 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 14 19%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 14 19%
Medicine and Dentistry 13 18%
Neuroscience 7 10%
Computer Science 3 4%
Other 6 8%
Unknown 15 21%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 18 July 2017.
All research outputs
#6,909,309
of 12,010,397 outputs
Outputs from Clinical Epigenetics
#351
of 546 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#157,521
of 328,730 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Clinical Epigenetics
#6
of 18 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,010,397 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 40th percentile – i.e., 40% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 546 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.5. This one is in the 31st percentile – i.e., 31% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 328,730 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 49th percentile – i.e., 49% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 18 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 55% of its contemporaries.