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Effect of a short course of iron polymaltose on acquisition of malarial parasitaemia in anaemic Indonesian schoolchildren: a randomized trial

Overview of attention for article published in Malaria Journal, January 2017
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  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (68th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (71st percentile)

Mentioned by

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6 tweeters

Citations

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4 Dimensions

Readers on

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76 Mendeley
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Title
Effect of a short course of iron polymaltose on acquisition of malarial parasitaemia in anaemic Indonesian schoolchildren: a randomized trial
Published in
Malaria Journal, January 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12936-017-1691-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Margaretta A. Prasetyani, Quirijn de Mast, Robel Afeworki, Maria M. M. Kaisar, Difa Stefanie, Erliyani Sartono, Taniawati Supali, André J. van der Ven

Abstract

Concern exists about the safety of iron supplementation given to individuals in malarious areas. The possible unfavourable impact of iron supplementation on malaria might be less when slow-release iron compounds are used instead of ferrous salts, because no toxic non-transferrin bound iron is formed. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of iron supplementation using the slow-release iron compound iron polymaltose (IPM) on the acquisition of malarial parasitaemia. A randomized, placebo-controlled trial was performed in schoolchildren aged 5-18 years with mild or moderate anaemia on the Indonesian island Flores. Microscopic malaria-negative children were randomized to receive 8 weeks of IPM (6 mg elemental iron/kg/day) or placebo . The primary outcomes were the occurrence of microscopically detectable malarial parasitaemia at week 4, 8, 12 and 16 after start of treatment and the proportion of participants with real-time (RT) PCR positive malarial parasitaemia at week 16. 294 Children were assigned to the IPM group and 297 to the placebo group. Whereas IPM supplementation failed to increased haemoglobin or ferritin concentrations, the IPM group had a significantly higher rate of occurrence of microscopically detectable parasitaemia [hazard ratio 2.2, 95% C.I. 1.2-4.0; P = 0.01]. This higher rate was confined to iron-replete children. At the end of the study, 89% of the children in the IPM group had remained free from microscopically detectable parasitaemia vs 95% of children in the placebo group. The proportion of plasmodial RT-PCR positive children was similar in both groups at week 16 (IPM group 16.6% vs placebo group 14.3%; P = 0.47). When analysis was restricted to iron-replete children (serum ferritin ≥30 µg/l), there was a trend for a higher proportion being RT-PCR positive at week 16 in the IPM group compared with the placebo group (20 vs 13.3%; P = 0.07). Erythrocyte microcytosis was an independent risk factor for microscopically detectable malarial parasitaemia. A short course of IPM should be used cautiously in anaemic children in malaria endemic areas, as it has limited efficacy in treating iron deficiency, while it increases the rate of microscopic malarial parasitaemia in those with replete iron stores. Trial registration ISRCTN 83091970. Registered 16 May 2012 (retrospectively registered).

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 6 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 76 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 76 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 14 18%
Student > Master 12 16%
Researcher 10 13%
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 7%
Other 11 14%
Unknown 18 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 20 26%
Nursing and Health Professions 13 17%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 3 4%
Social Sciences 3 4%
Immunology and Microbiology 2 3%
Other 11 14%
Unknown 24 32%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 20 January 2018.
All research outputs
#3,319,300
of 12,390,159 outputs
Outputs from Malaria Journal
#1,140
of 3,623 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#104,404
of 333,637 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Malaria Journal
#30
of 109 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,390,159 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 73rd percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,623 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.3. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 67% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 333,637 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 68% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 109 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 71% of its contemporaries.