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Increase in brain activation due to sub-tasks during driving: fMRI study using new MR-compatible driving simulator

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Physiological Anthropology, January 2017
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Title
Increase in brain activation due to sub-tasks during driving: fMRI study using new MR-compatible driving simulator
Published in
Journal of Physiological Anthropology, January 2017
DOI 10.1186/s40101-017-0128-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Mi-Hyun Choi, Hyung-Sik Kim, Hee-Jeong Yoon, Jung-Chul Lee, Ji-Hye Baek, Jin-Seung Choi, Gye-Rae Tack, Byung-Chan Min, Dae-Woon Lim, Soon-Cheol Chung

Abstract

Several studies have used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to show that neural activity is associated with driving. fMRI studies have also elucidated the brain responses associated with driving while performing sub-tasks. It is important to note that these studies used computer mouses, trackballs, or joysticks to simulate driving and, thus, were not comparable to real driving situations. In order to overcome these limitations, we used a driving wheel and pedal equipped with an MR-compatible driving simulator (80 km/h). The subjects drove while performing sub-tasks, and we attempted to observe differences in neuronal activation. The experiments consisted of three blocks and each block consisted of both a control phase (1 min) and a driving phase (2 min). During the control phase, the drivers were instructed to look at the stop screen and to not perform driving tasks. During the driving phase, the drivers either drove (driving only condition) or drove while performing an additional sub-task (driving with sub-task condition) at 80 km/h. Compared to when the drivers were focused only on driving, when the drivers drove while performing a sub-task, the number of activation voxels greatly decreased in the parietal area, which is responsible for spatial perception. Task-performing areas, such as the inferior frontal gyrus and the superior temporal gyrus, showed increased activation. Performing a sub-task simultaneously while driving had affected the driver's driving. The cingulate gyrus and the sub-lobar region (lentiform nucleus, caudate, insula, and thalamus), which are responsible for error monitoring and control of unnecessary movements (e.g., wheel and pedal movements), showed increased activation during driving with sub-task condition compared to driving only condition. Unlike simple driving simulators (joysticks, computer mouses, or trackballs) used in previous research, the addition of a driving wheel and pedals (accelerator and brake) to the driving simulator used in this study closely represents real driving. Thus, the number of processed movements was increased, which led to an increased number of unnecessary movements that needed to be controlled. This in turn increased activation in the corresponding brain regions.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 31 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 3%
Unknown 30 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 5 16%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 16%
Student > Bachelor 4 13%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 10%
Professor 1 3%
Other 4 13%
Unknown 9 29%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Neuroscience 7 23%
Psychology 7 23%
Engineering 4 13%
Medicine and Dentistry 1 3%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 3%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 11 35%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 03 February 2017.
All research outputs
#4,884,425
of 9,003,777 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Physiological Anthropology
#88
of 152 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#174,415
of 309,116 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Physiological Anthropology
#4
of 5 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 9,003,777 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 27th percentile – i.e., 27% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 152 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.1. This one is in the 28th percentile – i.e., 28% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 309,116 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 33rd percentile – i.e., 33% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 5 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one.