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Training needs and perspectives of community health workers in relation to integrating child mental health care into primary health care in a rural setting in sub-Saharan Africa: a mixed methods study

Overview of attention for article published in International Journal of Mental Health Systems, February 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (71st percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (66th percentile)

Mentioned by

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5 tweeters

Citations

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20 Dimensions

Readers on

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157 Mendeley
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Title
Training needs and perspectives of community health workers in relation to integrating child mental health care into primary health care in a rural setting in sub-Saharan Africa: a mixed methods study
Published in
International Journal of Mental Health Systems, February 2017
DOI 10.1186/s13033-017-0121-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Dejene Tilahun, Charlotte Hanlon, Mesfin Araya, Basiro Davey, Rosa A. Hoekstra, Abebaw Fekadu

Abstract

Community health workers can help to address the substantial unmet need for child mental health care in low and middle income countries. However, little is known about their training needs for this potential role. The aim of this study was to examine training needs and perspectives of community health extension workers (HEWs) in relation to providing child mental health care in rural Ethiopia. The study was conducted in the Southern Nations, Nationalities and Peoples' Region of Ethiopia. A mixed methods approach was used. A total of 104 HEWs who had received training in child mental health using the Health Education and Training (HEAT) curriculum were interviewed using a structured survey. In-depth interviews were then conducted with 11 HEWs purposively selected on the basis of the administrative zone they had come from. A framework approach was used for qualitative data analysis. Most of the HEWs (88.5%; n = 93/104) reported that they were interested in the training provided and all respondents considered child mental health to be important. The perceived benefits of training included improved knowledge (n = 52), case identification (n = 14) and service provision (n = 22). While most of the participants had their training four months prior to the interview, over a third of them (35.6%; n = 37) had already organized mental health awareness-raising meetings. Participants in the qualitative interviews considered the problem of child mental disorders to be widespread and to cause a large burden to the family and the affected children. They reported that improving their competence and knowledge was important to address the problem and to tackle stigma and discrimination. Participants also listed some barriers for service provision, including lack of competence, stigma and institutional constraints. Opportunities mentioned included staff commitment, high levels of interest and a positive attitude towards providing the service. Although the HEAT training on child mental health was brief, it appears to have had some impact in improving knowledge and care provision. If the key barriers to service provision are addressed and supported by policy guidance, community health workers may contribute substantially in addressing the treatment gap for children with mental health needs.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 157 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Unknown 156 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 37 24%
Researcher 23 15%
Student > Doctoral Student 14 9%
Student > Ph. D. Student 12 8%
Student > Postgraduate 12 8%
Other 33 21%
Unknown 26 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 30 19%
Psychology 27 17%
Nursing and Health Professions 22 14%
Social Sciences 22 14%
Business, Management and Accounting 4 3%
Other 20 13%
Unknown 32 20%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 5. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 24 April 2017.
All research outputs
#2,142,145
of 9,728,130 outputs
Outputs from International Journal of Mental Health Systems
#133
of 349 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#89,620
of 316,425 outputs
Outputs of similar age from International Journal of Mental Health Systems
#5
of 15 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 9,728,130 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 77th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 349 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.7. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 61% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 316,425 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 71% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 15 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 66% of its contemporaries.