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Pesticide exposure: the hormonal function of the female reproductive system disrupted?

Overview of attention for article published in Reproductive Biology and Endocrinology, May 2006
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • One of the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#10 of 899)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
14 news outlets
blogs
1 blog
policy
6 policy sources
twitter
10 tweeters
facebook
2 Facebook pages
wikipedia
6 Wikipedia pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
176 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
307 Mendeley
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Title
Pesticide exposure: the hormonal function of the female reproductive system disrupted?
Published in
Reproductive Biology and Endocrinology, May 2006
DOI 10.1186/1477-7827-4-30
Pubmed ID
Authors

Reini W Bretveld, Chris MG Thomas, Paul TJ Scheepers, Gerhard A Zielhuis, Nel Roeleveld

Abstract

Some pesticides may interfere with the female hormonal function, which may lead to negative effects on the reproductive system through disruption of the hormonal balance necessary for proper functioning. Previous studies primarily focused on interference with the estrogen and/or androgen receptor, but the hormonal function may be disrupted in many more ways through pesticide exposure. The aim of this review is to give an overview of the various ways in which pesticides may disrupt the hormonal function of the female reproductive system and in particular the ovarian cycle. Disruption can occur in all stages of hormonal regulation: 1. hormone synthesis; 2. hormone release and storage; 3. hormone transport and clearance; 4. hormone receptor recognition and binding; 5. hormone postreceptor activation; 6. the thyroid function; and 7. the central nervous system. These mechanisms are described for effects of pesticide exposure in vitro and on experimental animals in vivo. For the latter, potential effects of endocrine disrupting pesticides on the female reproductive system, i.e. modulation of hormone concentrations, ovarian cycle irregularities, and impaired fertility, are also reviewed. In epidemiological studies, exposure to pesticides has been associated with menstrual cycle disturbances, reduced fertility, prolonged time-to-pregnancy, spontaneous abortion, stillbirths, and developmental defects, which may or may not be due to disruption of the female hormonal function. Because pesticides comprise a large number of distinct substances with dissimilar structures and diverse toxicity, it is most likely that several of the above-mentioned mechanisms are involved in the pathophysiological pathways explaining the role of pesticide exposure in ovarian cycle disturbances, ultimately leading to fertility problems and other reproductive effects. In future research, information on the ways in which pesticides may disrupt the hormonal function as described in this review, can be used to generate specific hypotheses for studies on the effects of pesticides on the ovarian cycle, both in toxicological and epidemiological settings.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 10 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 307 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Australia 2 <1%
United States 1 <1%
Mexico 1 <1%
Unknown 303 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 64 21%
Student > Ph. D. Student 41 13%
Student > Bachelor 41 13%
Other 20 7%
Researcher 18 6%
Other 56 18%
Unknown 67 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 52 17%
Medicine and Dentistry 35 11%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 31 10%
Environmental Science 31 10%
Nursing and Health Professions 21 7%
Other 61 20%
Unknown 76 25%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 144. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 03 June 2022.
All research outputs
#215,566
of 21,592,309 outputs
Outputs from Reproductive Biology and Endocrinology
#10
of 899 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#1,485
of 173,864 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Reproductive Biology and Endocrinology
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,592,309 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 899 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.8. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 173,864 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them