↓ Skip to main content

Chronic stress does not impair liver regeneration in rats

Overview of attention for article published in Regenerative Medicine Research, December 2015
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (53rd percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
4 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
2 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
6 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Chronic stress does not impair liver regeneration in rats
Published in
Regenerative Medicine Research, December 2015
DOI 10.1186/s40340-015-0011-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Kasper J. Andersen, Anders R. Knudsen, Ove Wiborg, Frank V. Mortensen

Abstract

Although wound healing is a simple regenerative process that is critical after surgery, it has been shown to be impaired under psychological stress. The liver has a unique capacity to regenerate through highly complex mechanisms. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of chronic stress, which may induce a depression-like state, on the complex process of liver regeneration in rats. Twenty rats were included in this study. The animals received either a standard housing protocol or were subjected to a Chronic Mild Stress (CMS) stress paradigm. All rats underwent a 70 % partial hepatectomy (PHx). The animals were evaluated on postoperative day 2 or 4. Blood samples were collected to examine circulating markers of inflammation and liver cell damage. Additionally, liver tissues were sampled to evaluate liver weight and regeneration rate. None of the animals died during the study. There were no differences between in body weight, liver weight, liver regeneration rate or biochemical markers at any time during the study. The results of this study indicate that stress and the induction of depression-like state do not affect the process of liver regeneration after 70 % hepatectomy in rats.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 6 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Spain 1 17%
Unknown 5 83%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 2 33%
Librarian 1 17%
Lecturer 1 17%
Professor 1 17%
Unknown 1 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 2 33%
Immunology and Microbiology 1 17%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 17%
Unknown 2 33%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 13 February 2018.
All research outputs
#7,057,717
of 12,504,607 outputs
Outputs from Regenerative Medicine Research
#8
of 22 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#150,874
of 336,115 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Regenerative Medicine Research
#1
of 3 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,504,607 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 42nd percentile – i.e., 42% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 22 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.0. This one scored the same or higher as 14 of them.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 336,115 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 53% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 3 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them