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Abnormal activity of default mode network in GERD patients

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Neuroscience, July 2013
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Mentioned by

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3 tweeters

Citations

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5 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
22 Mendeley
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Title
Abnormal activity of default mode network in GERD patients
Published in
BMC Neuroscience, July 2013
DOI 10.1186/1471-2202-14-69
Pubmed ID
Authors

Huihui Sun, Ying Chen, Xiaohu Zhao, Xiangbin Wang, Yuanxi Jiang, Ping Wu, Yinhan Tang, Qingwei Meng, Shuchang Xu

Abstract

Abnormal processing of esophageal sensation at the level of the central nervous system has been proven to be involved in gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). However, most studies were focused on the possible functions of perceptual processing related network during task status, little attention has been paid to default mode network, which has been manifested to be important in the pathogenesis of many diseases. In our study, we compared the brain activity characteristic in GERD patients with the healthy subjects (HS) at baseline, looking for whether activities of default mode network were abnormal in GERD patients and attempting to identify their possible roles in GERD. In present study, fractional amplitude of low-frequency fluctuation was adopted to detect the brain activities at baseline. Group-level analyses were conducted by one-sample t test within groups (voxel thresholds were p<0.001 and cluster level>42, corrected P<0.05) and independent-samples t test between groups (p<0.01 and cluster level>90, corrected P<0.05) using SPM5.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 22 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 5%
Unknown 21 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 27%
Researcher 3 14%
Student > Master 3 14%
Professor 2 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 1 5%
Other 4 18%
Unknown 3 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 8 36%
Psychology 4 18%
Neuroscience 4 18%
Engineering 2 9%
Social Sciences 1 5%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 3 14%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 13 July 2013.
All research outputs
#13,892,191
of 22,714,025 outputs
Outputs from BMC Neuroscience
#582
of 1,241 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#106,852
of 194,295 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Neuroscience
#25
of 49 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,714,025 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,241 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.3. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 51% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 194,295 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 43rd percentile – i.e., 43% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 49 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 42nd percentile – i.e., 42% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.