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Resistant starch can improve insulin sensitivity independently of the gut microbiota

Overview of attention for article published in Microbiome, February 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#48 of 1,143)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (98th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
12 news outlets
blogs
2 blogs
twitter
57 tweeters
facebook
6 Facebook pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
71 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
203 Mendeley
citeulike
2 CiteULike
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Title
Resistant starch can improve insulin sensitivity independently of the gut microbiota
Published in
Microbiome, February 2017
DOI 10.1186/s40168-017-0230-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Laure B. Bindels, Rafael R. Segura Munoz, João Carlos Gomes-Neto, Valentin Mutemberezi, Inés Martínez, Nuria Salazar, Elizabeth A. Cody, Maria I. Quintero-Villegas, Hatem Kittana, Clara G de los Reyes-Gavilán, Robert J. Schmaltz, Giulio G. Muccioli, Jens Walter, Amanda E. Ramer-Tait

Abstract

Obesity-related diseases, including type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease, have reached epidemic proportions in industrialized nations, and dietary interventions for their prevention are therefore important. Resistant starches (RS) improve insulin sensitivity in clinical trials, but the mechanisms underlying this health benefit remain poorly understood. Because RS fermentation by the gut microbiota results in the formation of physiologically active metabolites, we chose to specifically determine the role of the gut microbiota in mediating the metabolic benefits of RS. To achieve this goal, we determined the effects of RS when added to a Western diet on host metabolism in mice with and without a microbiota. RS feeding of conventionalized mice improved insulin sensitivity and redressed some of the Western diet-induced changes in microbiome composition. However, parallel experiments in germ-free littermates revealed that RS-mediated improvements in insulin levels also occurred in the absence of a microbiota. RS reduced gene expression of adipose tissue macrophage markers and altered cecal concentrations of several bile acids in both germ-free and conventionalized mice; these effects were strongly correlated with the metabolic benefits, providing a potential microbiota-independent mechanism to explain the physiological effects of RS. This study demonstrated that some metabolic benefits exerted by dietary RS, especially improvements in insulin levels, occur independently of the microbiota and could involve alterations in the bile acid cycle and adipose tissue immune modulation. This work also sets a precedent for future mechanistic studies aimed at establishing the causative role of the gut microbiota in mediating the benefits of bioactive compounds and functional foods.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 57 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 203 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 <1%
Unknown 202 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 30 15%
Researcher 28 14%
Student > Master 26 13%
Student > Bachelor 19 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 14 7%
Other 46 23%
Unknown 40 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 55 27%
Medicine and Dentistry 29 14%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 23 11%
Immunology and Microbiology 14 7%
Chemistry 6 3%
Other 25 12%
Unknown 51 25%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 149. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 28 August 2021.
All research outputs
#172,655
of 18,964,669 outputs
Outputs from Microbiome
#48
of 1,143 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#5,283
of 374,459 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Microbiome
#1
of 8 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 18,964,669 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,143 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 40.3. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 374,459 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 8 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them