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A primer on the use of mouse models for identifying direct sex chromosome effects that cause sex differences in non-gonadal tissues

Overview of attention for article published in Biology of Sex Differences, December 2016
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2 tweeters

Citations

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Title
A primer on the use of mouse models for identifying direct sex chromosome effects that cause sex differences in non-gonadal tissues
Published in
Biology of Sex Differences, December 2016
DOI 10.1186/s13293-016-0115-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Paul S. Burgoyne, Arthur P. Arnold

Abstract

In animals with heteromorphic sex chromosomes, all sex differences originate from the sex chromosomes, which are the only factors that are consistently different in male and female zygotes. In mammals, the imbalance in Y gene expression, specifically the presence vs. absence of Sry, initiates the differentiation of testes in males, setting up lifelong sex differences in the level of gonadal hormones, which in turn cause many sex differences in the phenotype of non-gonadal tissues. The inherent imbalance in the expression of X and Y genes, or in the epigenetic impact of X and Y chromosomes, also has the potential to contribute directly to the sexual differentiation of non-gonadal cells. Here, we review the research strategies to identify the X and Y genes or chromosomal regions that cause direct, sexually differentiating effects on non-gonadal cells. Some mouse models are useful for separating the effects of sex chromosomes from those of gonadal hormones. Once direct "sex chromosome effects" are detected in these models, further studies are required to narrow down the list of candidate X and/or Y genes and then to identify the sexually differentiating genes themselves. Logical approaches to the search for these genes are reviewed here.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 65 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 2%
Unknown 64 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 19 29%
Student > Bachelor 8 12%
Researcher 7 11%
Student > Master 7 11%
Professor > Associate Professor 5 8%
Other 13 20%
Unknown 6 9%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 19 29%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 13 20%
Neuroscience 7 11%
Medicine and Dentistry 7 11%
Immunology and Microbiology 2 3%
Other 6 9%
Unknown 11 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 18 July 2022.
All research outputs
#13,471,991
of 21,596,161 outputs
Outputs from Biology of Sex Differences
#288
of 428 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#211,897
of 392,947 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Biology of Sex Differences
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,596,161 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 35th percentile – i.e., 35% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 428 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 19.8. This one is in the 27th percentile – i.e., 27% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 392,947 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 43rd percentile – i.e., 43% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them